A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors

Hye Seung Jung, Seong Ho Choi, Sung Joo Kim, Kyu Taek Lee, Jong Kyun Lee, Kee Taek Jang, byungwan lee, Jae Hwan Jee, Seung Hoon Oh, You Ran Ahn, Moon Kyu Lee, Kwang Won Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies in rats have shown that brain death decreases β-cell function and causes islet cell death during islet isolation and transplantation. Because a direct comparison of human islet cells between living and cadaveric donors has not been reported to date, we studied the effects of brain death on islet cell yield. A total of 36 pancreas specimens from 20 living donors and 16 cadaveric donors were used for analysis. Islets were isolated with a Ricordi chamber, and counted as equivalent islet numbers (EIN). Living donors were predominantly female, and cadaveric donors were mainly male. Although the cold ischemic time, pancreas distensibility and digestion time were not different, islet yield was observed to be higher in living donors compared with cadaveric donors (5800 ± 3500 vs. 1900 ± 2000EIN/g pancreas). Islet isolation success rates (when defined as more than 2000EIN/g) were 94.1% and 42.9%, respectively. Post-Ficoll islet recovery rates and purity were also better in living donors. However, islet viability and in vitro function of isolated islets showed no significant differences between the groups. These results suggested that brain death negatively affected the processes of islet isolation from the pancreas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-743
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Living Donors
Islets of Langerhans
Tissue Donors
Brain Death
Pancreas
Cold Ischemia
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Ficoll
Digestion
Cell Death

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Jung, H. S., Choi, S. H., Kim, S. J., Lee, K. T., Lee, J. K., Jang, K. T., ... Kim, K. W. (2007). A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors. Clinical Transplantation, 21(6), 738-743. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00731.x
Jung, Hye Seung ; Choi, Seong Ho ; Kim, Sung Joo ; Lee, Kyu Taek ; Lee, Jong Kyun ; Jang, Kee Taek ; lee, byungwan ; Jee, Jae Hwan ; Oh, Seung Hoon ; Ahn, You Ran ; Lee, Moon Kyu ; Kim, Kwang Won. / A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors. In: Clinical Transplantation. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 738-743.
@article{fb36123cbfee4f998401dd36f1f6c1c3,
title = "A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors",
abstract = "Studies in rats have shown that brain death decreases β-cell function and causes islet cell death during islet isolation and transplantation. Because a direct comparison of human islet cells between living and cadaveric donors has not been reported to date, we studied the effects of brain death on islet cell yield. A total of 36 pancreas specimens from 20 living donors and 16 cadaveric donors were used for analysis. Islets were isolated with a Ricordi chamber, and counted as equivalent islet numbers (EIN). Living donors were predominantly female, and cadaveric donors were mainly male. Although the cold ischemic time, pancreas distensibility and digestion time were not different, islet yield was observed to be higher in living donors compared with cadaveric donors (5800 ± 3500 vs. 1900 ± 2000EIN/g pancreas). Islet isolation success rates (when defined as more than 2000EIN/g) were 94.1{\%} and 42.9{\%}, respectively. Post-Ficoll islet recovery rates and purity were also better in living donors. However, islet viability and in vitro function of isolated islets showed no significant differences between the groups. These results suggested that brain death negatively affected the processes of islet isolation from the pancreas.",
author = "Jung, {Hye Seung} and Choi, {Seong Ho} and Kim, {Sung Joo} and Lee, {Kyu Taek} and Lee, {Jong Kyun} and Jang, {Kee Taek} and byungwan lee and Jee, {Jae Hwan} and Oh, {Seung Hoon} and Ahn, {You Ran} and Lee, {Moon Kyu} and Kim, {Kwang Won}",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00731.x",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "738--743",
journal = "Clinical Transplantation",
issn = "0902-0063",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Jung, HS, Choi, SH, Kim, SJ, Lee, KT, Lee, JK, Jang, KT, lee, B, Jee, JH, Oh, SH, Ahn, YR, Lee, MK & Kim, KW 2007, 'A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors', Clinical Transplantation, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 738-743. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00731.x

A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors. / Jung, Hye Seung; Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Jong Kyun; Jang, Kee Taek; lee, byungwan; Jee, Jae Hwan; Oh, Seung Hoon; Ahn, You Ran; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kwang Won.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 21, No. 6, 01.11.2007, p. 738-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A better yield of islet cell mass from living pancreatic donors compared with cadaveric donors

AU - Jung, Hye Seung

AU - Choi, Seong Ho

AU - Kim, Sung Joo

AU - Lee, Kyu Taek

AU - Lee, Jong Kyun

AU - Jang, Kee Taek

AU - lee, byungwan

AU - Jee, Jae Hwan

AU - Oh, Seung Hoon

AU - Ahn, You Ran

AU - Lee, Moon Kyu

AU - Kim, Kwang Won

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - Studies in rats have shown that brain death decreases β-cell function and causes islet cell death during islet isolation and transplantation. Because a direct comparison of human islet cells between living and cadaveric donors has not been reported to date, we studied the effects of brain death on islet cell yield. A total of 36 pancreas specimens from 20 living donors and 16 cadaveric donors were used for analysis. Islets were isolated with a Ricordi chamber, and counted as equivalent islet numbers (EIN). Living donors were predominantly female, and cadaveric donors were mainly male. Although the cold ischemic time, pancreas distensibility and digestion time were not different, islet yield was observed to be higher in living donors compared with cadaveric donors (5800 ± 3500 vs. 1900 ± 2000EIN/g pancreas). Islet isolation success rates (when defined as more than 2000EIN/g) were 94.1% and 42.9%, respectively. Post-Ficoll islet recovery rates and purity were also better in living donors. However, islet viability and in vitro function of isolated islets showed no significant differences between the groups. These results suggested that brain death negatively affected the processes of islet isolation from the pancreas.

AB - Studies in rats have shown that brain death decreases β-cell function and causes islet cell death during islet isolation and transplantation. Because a direct comparison of human islet cells between living and cadaveric donors has not been reported to date, we studied the effects of brain death on islet cell yield. A total of 36 pancreas specimens from 20 living donors and 16 cadaveric donors were used for analysis. Islets were isolated with a Ricordi chamber, and counted as equivalent islet numbers (EIN). Living donors were predominantly female, and cadaveric donors were mainly male. Although the cold ischemic time, pancreas distensibility and digestion time were not different, islet yield was observed to be higher in living donors compared with cadaveric donors (5800 ± 3500 vs. 1900 ± 2000EIN/g pancreas). Islet isolation success rates (when defined as more than 2000EIN/g) were 94.1% and 42.9%, respectively. Post-Ficoll islet recovery rates and purity were also better in living donors. However, islet viability and in vitro function of isolated islets showed no significant differences between the groups. These results suggested that brain death negatively affected the processes of islet isolation from the pancreas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35848941504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35848941504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00731.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1399-0012.2007.00731.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 17988267

AN - SCOPUS:35848941504

VL - 21

SP - 738

EP - 743

JO - Clinical Transplantation

JF - Clinical Transplantation

SN - 0902-0063

IS - 6

ER -