A change in social activity affect cognitive function in middle-aged and older Koreans

analysis of a Korean longitudinal study on aging (2006–2012)

Young Choi, Sohee Park, Kyoung Hee Cho, Sung Youn Chun, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between a changes in social activity and cognitive function in Koreans aged 45 years or older. Methods: Data were obtained from 6076 participants aged 45 years and older included in the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2012). Cognitive function was measured using the mini-mental state examination—Korean version (MMSE-K). Participation in social activities was classified as “consistent participation,” “consistent non-participation,” “participation to non-participation,” and “non-participation to participation.” Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship between type of social activity (religious organizations, friendship organizations, leisure/culture/sports clubs, family or school reunion, volunteering work, and political organizations), and cognitive function. Results: Individuals who reported “no participation to participation” (b = 0.778, p < 0.0001) and “consistent participation” (b = 0.968, p < 0.0001) were more likely to show reduced cognitive decline than those who reported “consistent non-participation” (p < 0.0001 for trend). The positive association between cognitive function and consistent participation in religious activities, friendship organizations, and family/school reunions was particularly strong (b = 0.325, p < 0.0001; b = 0.570, p < 0.0001; b = 0.234, p = 0.0004; respectively, versus consistent non-participation). Conclusions: Promotion of participation in religious organizations, friendship organizations, and family/school reunions (only for older persons) may help preserve cognitive function in individuals aged 45 years or older in Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-919
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Aug 1

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Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Reunion
Organizations
Leisure Activities
Korea
Sports
Linear Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "A change in social activity affect cognitive function in middle-aged and older Koreans: analysis of a Korean longitudinal study on aging (2006–2012)",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the association between a changes in social activity and cognitive function in Koreans aged 45 years or older. Methods: Data were obtained from 6076 participants aged 45 years and older included in the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2012). Cognitive function was measured using the mini-mental state examination—Korean version (MMSE-K). Participation in social activities was classified as “consistent participation,” “consistent non-participation,” “participation to non-participation,” and “non-participation to participation.” Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship between type of social activity (religious organizations, friendship organizations, leisure/culture/sports clubs, family or school reunion, volunteering work, and political organizations), and cognitive function. Results: Individuals who reported “no participation to participation” (b = 0.778, p < 0.0001) and “consistent participation” (b = 0.968, p < 0.0001) were more likely to show reduced cognitive decline than those who reported “consistent non-participation” (p < 0.0001 for trend). The positive association between cognitive function and consistent participation in religious activities, friendship organizations, and family/school reunions was particularly strong (b = 0.325, p < 0.0001; b = 0.570, p < 0.0001; b = 0.234, p = 0.0004; respectively, versus consistent non-participation). Conclusions: Promotion of participation in religious organizations, friendship organizations, and family/school reunions (only for older persons) may help preserve cognitive function in individuals aged 45 years or older in Korea.",
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A change in social activity affect cognitive function in middle-aged and older Koreans : analysis of a Korean longitudinal study on aging (2006–2012). / Choi, Young; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyoung Hee; Chun, Sung Youn; Park, Euncheol.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 31, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 912-919.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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