A comparison of 24- vs. 48-week peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C

M. N. Kim, Ki Tae Yoon, Jun Yong Park, Do Young Kim, Sang Hoon Ahn, Chae Yoon Chon, Kwang Hyub Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The standard therapy for patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a combination of peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. However, the most appropriate duration of treatment remains to be established because of treatment-related side effects and cost. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of 24- and 48-week treatments, and to assess the efficacy of split 24-week therapy (a further 24 weeks of treatment in patients with relapse after the initial 24 weeks of treatment). METHODS: A total of 130 patients with genotype 1 CHC was treated between June 2004 and December 2006. Patients with undetectable HCV RNA at 24 weeks of treatment (as assessed by qualitative PCR assay; n=101 patients) were allowed to choose either 24 or 48 weeks as the duration of their treatment; 51 patients chose the 24-week treatment regimen and the remainder chose the 48-week regimen. Patients who relapsed after 24 weeks of treatment were treated for further 24 weeks. The sustained virologic response (SVR) of each treatment group was analyzed. RESULTS: The SVR rate was higher in patients treated for 48 weeks than in those treated for 24 weeks (74.0% vs. 52.9%, P=0.028). In the multivariate analysis, age < 50 years, platelets > or = 150,000/mm(3), and treatment duration for 48 weeks remained significant independent predictors of SVR. Fourteen of the 24 patients who relapsed in the 24-week treatment group received split 24-week therapy, and 6 patients (42.9%) achieved SVR. The overall SVR rate did not differ significantly between the 24-week treatment group, including those who underwent 24-week split therapy (64.7%), and the 48-week treatment group (64.7% vs. 74%, P=0.311). CONCLUSIONS: The 24-week plus additional split 24-week therapy following failure is a useful treatment strategy for patients with genotype 1 CHC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)496-503
Number of pages8
JournalThe Korean journal of hepatology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec

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Ribavirin
Chronic Hepatitis C
Genotype
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{cd13c0b1079d4fa2a5e8be9043316ad7,
title = "A comparison of 24- vs. 48-week peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/AIMS: The standard therapy for patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a combination of peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. However, the most appropriate duration of treatment remains to be established because of treatment-related side effects and cost. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of 24- and 48-week treatments, and to assess the efficacy of split 24-week therapy (a further 24 weeks of treatment in patients with relapse after the initial 24 weeks of treatment). METHODS: A total of 130 patients with genotype 1 CHC was treated between June 2004 and December 2006. Patients with undetectable HCV RNA at 24 weeks of treatment (as assessed by qualitative PCR assay; n=101 patients) were allowed to choose either 24 or 48 weeks as the duration of their treatment; 51 patients chose the 24-week treatment regimen and the remainder chose the 48-week regimen. Patients who relapsed after 24 weeks of treatment were treated for further 24 weeks. The sustained virologic response (SVR) of each treatment group was analyzed. RESULTS: The SVR rate was higher in patients treated for 48 weeks than in those treated for 24 weeks (74.0{\%} vs. 52.9{\%}, P=0.028). In the multivariate analysis, age < 50 years, platelets > or = 150,000/mm(3), and treatment duration for 48 weeks remained significant independent predictors of SVR. Fourteen of the 24 patients who relapsed in the 24-week treatment group received split 24-week therapy, and 6 patients (42.9{\%}) achieved SVR. The overall SVR rate did not differ significantly between the 24-week treatment group, including those who underwent 24-week split therapy (64.7{\%}), and the 48-week treatment group (64.7{\%} vs. 74{\%}, P=0.311). CONCLUSIONS: The 24-week plus additional split 24-week therapy following failure is a useful treatment strategy for patients with genotype 1 CHC.",
author = "Kim, {M. N.} and Yoon, {Ki Tae} and Park, {Jun Yong} and Kim, {Do Young} and Ahn, {Sang Hoon} and Chon, {Chae Yoon} and Han, {Kwang Hyub}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
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language = "English",
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A comparison of 24- vs. 48-week peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C. / Kim, M. N.; Yoon, Ki Tae; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Chon, Chae Yoon; Han, Kwang Hyub.

In: The Korean journal of hepatology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 496-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A comparison of 24- vs. 48-week peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C

AU - Kim, M. N.

AU - Yoon, Ki Tae

AU - Park, Jun Yong

AU - Kim, Do Young

AU - Ahn, Sang Hoon

AU - Chon, Chae Yoon

AU - Han, Kwang Hyub

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: The standard therapy for patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a combination of peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. However, the most appropriate duration of treatment remains to be established because of treatment-related side effects and cost. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of 24- and 48-week treatments, and to assess the efficacy of split 24-week therapy (a further 24 weeks of treatment in patients with relapse after the initial 24 weeks of treatment). METHODS: A total of 130 patients with genotype 1 CHC was treated between June 2004 and December 2006. Patients with undetectable HCV RNA at 24 weeks of treatment (as assessed by qualitative PCR assay; n=101 patients) were allowed to choose either 24 or 48 weeks as the duration of their treatment; 51 patients chose the 24-week treatment regimen and the remainder chose the 48-week regimen. Patients who relapsed after 24 weeks of treatment were treated for further 24 weeks. The sustained virologic response (SVR) of each treatment group was analyzed. RESULTS: The SVR rate was higher in patients treated for 48 weeks than in those treated for 24 weeks (74.0% vs. 52.9%, P=0.028). In the multivariate analysis, age < 50 years, platelets > or = 150,000/mm(3), and treatment duration for 48 weeks remained significant independent predictors of SVR. Fourteen of the 24 patients who relapsed in the 24-week treatment group received split 24-week therapy, and 6 patients (42.9%) achieved SVR. The overall SVR rate did not differ significantly between the 24-week treatment group, including those who underwent 24-week split therapy (64.7%), and the 48-week treatment group (64.7% vs. 74%, P=0.311). CONCLUSIONS: The 24-week plus additional split 24-week therapy following failure is a useful treatment strategy for patients with genotype 1 CHC.

AB - BACKGROUND/AIMS: The standard therapy for patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a combination of peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. However, the most appropriate duration of treatment remains to be established because of treatment-related side effects and cost. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of 24- and 48-week treatments, and to assess the efficacy of split 24-week therapy (a further 24 weeks of treatment in patients with relapse after the initial 24 weeks of treatment). METHODS: A total of 130 patients with genotype 1 CHC was treated between June 2004 and December 2006. Patients with undetectable HCV RNA at 24 weeks of treatment (as assessed by qualitative PCR assay; n=101 patients) were allowed to choose either 24 or 48 weeks as the duration of their treatment; 51 patients chose the 24-week treatment regimen and the remainder chose the 48-week regimen. Patients who relapsed after 24 weeks of treatment were treated for further 24 weeks. The sustained virologic response (SVR) of each treatment group was analyzed. RESULTS: The SVR rate was higher in patients treated for 48 weeks than in those treated for 24 weeks (74.0% vs. 52.9%, P=0.028). In the multivariate analysis, age < 50 years, platelets > or = 150,000/mm(3), and treatment duration for 48 weeks remained significant independent predictors of SVR. Fourteen of the 24 patients who relapsed in the 24-week treatment group received split 24-week therapy, and 6 patients (42.9%) achieved SVR. The overall SVR rate did not differ significantly between the 24-week treatment group, including those who underwent 24-week split therapy (64.7%), and the 48-week treatment group (64.7% vs. 74%, P=0.311). CONCLUSIONS: The 24-week plus additional split 24-week therapy following failure is a useful treatment strategy for patients with genotype 1 CHC.

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