A Cultural Orientation Approach to Work Orientation: Mongolian Workers’ Jobs, Careers, and Callings

Jiyoung Park, Yeeun Choi, Melody M. Chao, Uurtsaikh Beejinkhuu, Young Woo Sohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Culturally held beliefs about the self and its relations with others affect the way individuals view their work. In this study, we examined the associations between individualism-collectivism and the three work orientations (i.e., viewing work as a job, a career, or a calling). We also investigated whether the positive effects of a calling orientation can be generalized to a developing eastern country, Mongolia. Using a sample of 352 Mongolian workers, we found that those endorsing horizontal collectivism tended to view their work as a calling more than as a job or a career. Mongolians with a calling orientation reported having better satisfaction with job, salary, and life, more work meaningfulness, and less turnover intention than those viewing work as a job or a career. The results suggest that cultural orientations and work orientations are intertwined, and the positive roles of a calling orientation are generalizable to Mongolia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Career Development
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2021.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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