A dose–response relationship between long working hours and unmet need for access to hospital facilities

Hongdeok Seok, Jong Uk Won, Tae Il Lee, Yeong Kwang Kim, Wanhyung Lee, June Hee Lee, Jaehoon Roh, Jin Ha Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Lack of access to hospital facilities, indicating unmet healthcare need, plays an important role in health inequity in the workplace. We aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and unmet healthcare need. Methods We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys collected during 2007–2012, which included 8369 participants (4765 males, 3604 females) aged 20–54 years, who were paid workers. We used a logistic regression model with gender stratification to investigate the association between working hours and unmet healthcare need. Results Of the 8369 participants, 855 males (17.94%) and 981 females (27.22%) experienced unmet healthcare need. After adjusting for covariates, and compared to 30–39 working hours per week, the odds ratios (OR) of unmet healthcare need were 1.07 [(95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.76–1.51], 1.46 (95% CI 1.03–2.07), and 1.57 (95% CI 1.11–2.23) in males, and 1.13 (95% CI 0.92–1.40), 1.30 (95% CI 0.99–1.69), and 1.60 (95% CI 1.21–2.10) in females, for 40–49, 50–59, and ≥60 work hours per week, respectively. There was a dose–response relationship between working hours per week and unmet healthcare need in both genders. Conclusions Those who work long hours are more likely to have unmet healthcare needs, the cause of which seems to be lack of time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-143
Number of pages9
JournalScandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Nutrition Surveys
Korea
Workplace
Odds Ratio
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Seok, Hongdeok ; Won, Jong Uk ; Lee, Tae Il ; Kim, Yeong Kwang ; Lee, Wanhyung ; Lee, June Hee ; Roh, Jaehoon ; Yoon, Jin Ha. / A dose–response relationship between long working hours and unmet need for access to hospital facilities. In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health. 2016 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 135-143.
@article{ceca3e75dbe642a481972c5e6b2d97b8,
title = "A dose–response relationship between long working hours and unmet need for access to hospital facilities",
abstract = "Objectives Lack of access to hospital facilities, indicating unmet healthcare need, plays an important role in health inequity in the workplace. We aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and unmet healthcare need. Methods We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys collected during 2007–2012, which included 8369 participants (4765 males, 3604 females) aged 20–54 years, who were paid workers. We used a logistic regression model with gender stratification to investigate the association between working hours and unmet healthcare need. Results Of the 8369 participants, 855 males (17.94{\%}) and 981 females (27.22{\%}) experienced unmet healthcare need. After adjusting for covariates, and compared to 30–39 working hours per week, the odds ratios (OR) of unmet healthcare need were 1.07 [(95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI) 0.76–1.51], 1.46 (95{\%} CI 1.03–2.07), and 1.57 (95{\%} CI 1.11–2.23) in males, and 1.13 (95{\%} CI 0.92–1.40), 1.30 (95{\%} CI 0.99–1.69), and 1.60 (95{\%} CI 1.21–2.10) in females, for 40–49, 50–59, and ≥60 work hours per week, respectively. There was a dose–response relationship between working hours per week and unmet healthcare need in both genders. Conclusions Those who work long hours are more likely to have unmet healthcare needs, the cause of which seems to be lack of time.",
author = "Hongdeok Seok and Won, {Jong Uk} and Lee, {Tae Il} and Kim, {Yeong Kwang} and Wanhyung Lee and Lee, {June Hee} and Jaehoon Roh and Yoon, {Jin Ha}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5271/SJWEH.3551",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "135--143",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health",
issn = "0355-3140",
publisher = "Finnish Institute of Occupational Health",
number = "2",

}

A dose–response relationship between long working hours and unmet need for access to hospital facilities. / Seok, Hongdeok; Won, Jong Uk; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Yeong Kwang; Lee, Wanhyung; Lee, June Hee; Roh, Jaehoon; Yoon, Jin Ha.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.01.2016, p. 135-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A dose–response relationship between long working hours and unmet need for access to hospital facilities

AU - Seok, Hongdeok

AU - Won, Jong Uk

AU - Lee, Tae Il

AU - Kim, Yeong Kwang

AU - Lee, Wanhyung

AU - Lee, June Hee

AU - Roh, Jaehoon

AU - Yoon, Jin Ha

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objectives Lack of access to hospital facilities, indicating unmet healthcare need, plays an important role in health inequity in the workplace. We aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and unmet healthcare need. Methods We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys collected during 2007–2012, which included 8369 participants (4765 males, 3604 females) aged 20–54 years, who were paid workers. We used a logistic regression model with gender stratification to investigate the association between working hours and unmet healthcare need. Results Of the 8369 participants, 855 males (17.94%) and 981 females (27.22%) experienced unmet healthcare need. After adjusting for covariates, and compared to 30–39 working hours per week, the odds ratios (OR) of unmet healthcare need were 1.07 [(95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.76–1.51], 1.46 (95% CI 1.03–2.07), and 1.57 (95% CI 1.11–2.23) in males, and 1.13 (95% CI 0.92–1.40), 1.30 (95% CI 0.99–1.69), and 1.60 (95% CI 1.21–2.10) in females, for 40–49, 50–59, and ≥60 work hours per week, respectively. There was a dose–response relationship between working hours per week and unmet healthcare need in both genders. Conclusions Those who work long hours are more likely to have unmet healthcare needs, the cause of which seems to be lack of time.

AB - Objectives Lack of access to hospital facilities, indicating unmet healthcare need, plays an important role in health inequity in the workplace. We aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and unmet healthcare need. Methods We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys collected during 2007–2012, which included 8369 participants (4765 males, 3604 females) aged 20–54 years, who were paid workers. We used a logistic regression model with gender stratification to investigate the association between working hours and unmet healthcare need. Results Of the 8369 participants, 855 males (17.94%) and 981 females (27.22%) experienced unmet healthcare need. After adjusting for covariates, and compared to 30–39 working hours per week, the odds ratios (OR) of unmet healthcare need were 1.07 [(95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.76–1.51], 1.46 (95% CI 1.03–2.07), and 1.57 (95% CI 1.11–2.23) in males, and 1.13 (95% CI 0.92–1.40), 1.30 (95% CI 0.99–1.69), and 1.60 (95% CI 1.21–2.10) in females, for 40–49, 50–59, and ≥60 work hours per week, respectively. There was a dose–response relationship between working hours per week and unmet healthcare need in both genders. Conclusions Those who work long hours are more likely to have unmet healthcare needs, the cause of which seems to be lack of time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011310157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011310157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5271/SJWEH.3551

DO - 10.5271/SJWEH.3551

M3 - Article

C2 - 26862879

AN - SCOPUS:85011310157

VL - 42

SP - 135

EP - 143

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health

SN - 0355-3140

IS - 2

ER -