A femtosecond laser creates a stronger flap than a mechanical microkeratome

Yong Kim Jae, Joon Kim Myoung, Tae-im Kim, Hyun Jeung Choi, Ho Pak Jhang, Hungwon Tchah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To compare corneal flaps made with a femtosecond (FS) laser with those made with a mechanical microkeratome (MM) in rabbits, measuring early postoperative inflammation and apoptosis and late postoperative adhesion strength. METHODS. Study 1 involved four treatment groups: one with flaps made only with the FS laser (FS group), one with flaps made with the FS laser followed by excimer laser ablation (FS+LASIK), one with flaps made with the MM, and one with flaps made with the MM followed by excimer laser ablation (MM+LASIK). The eyes were analyzed by histology and TUNEL staining for apoptosis at 4 and 24 hours. Study 2 involved two reference groups: an FS group and an MM group. Adhesion strength was measured with a tension meter 1 and 3 months later. RESULTS. Study 1: Inflammatory cell infiltration in the central cornea was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group at 4 and 24 hours (P < 0.05) and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Infiltration at the peripheral interface was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Study 2: At 1 and 3 months, 126.7 and 191.3 grams of force (gf) were needed to detach the flaps in the FS group, compared with 65 and 127.5 gf in the MM group, respectively. The grams of force needed was significantly higher in the FS group than in the MM group at 3 months (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The FS laser produces greater corneal stromal inflammation than the MM early postoperatively without any increase in apoptosis and stronger flap adhesion late postoperatively. Therefore, it may require stronger anti-inflammatory drugs to be administered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)599-604
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Lasers
Excimer Lasers
Laser Therapy
Apoptosis
Inflammation
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Cornea
Histology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Staining and Labeling
Rabbits
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Jae, Yong Kim ; Myoung, Joon Kim ; Kim, Tae-im ; Choi, Hyun Jeung ; Jhang, Ho Pak ; Tchah, Hungwon. / A femtosecond laser creates a stronger flap than a mechanical microkeratome. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 599-604.
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abstract = "PURPOSE. To compare corneal flaps made with a femtosecond (FS) laser with those made with a mechanical microkeratome (MM) in rabbits, measuring early postoperative inflammation and apoptosis and late postoperative adhesion strength. METHODS. Study 1 involved four treatment groups: one with flaps made only with the FS laser (FS group), one with flaps made with the FS laser followed by excimer laser ablation (FS+LASIK), one with flaps made with the MM, and one with flaps made with the MM followed by excimer laser ablation (MM+LASIK). The eyes were analyzed by histology and TUNEL staining for apoptosis at 4 and 24 hours. Study 2 involved two reference groups: an FS group and an MM group. Adhesion strength was measured with a tension meter 1 and 3 months later. RESULTS. Study 1: Inflammatory cell infiltration in the central cornea was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group at 4 and 24 hours (P < 0.05) and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Infiltration at the peripheral interface was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Study 2: At 1 and 3 months, 126.7 and 191.3 grams of force (gf) were needed to detach the flaps in the FS group, compared with 65 and 127.5 gf in the MM group, respectively. The grams of force needed was significantly higher in the FS group than in the MM group at 3 months (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The FS laser produces greater corneal stromal inflammation than the MM early postoperatively without any increase in apoptosis and stronger flap adhesion late postoperatively. Therefore, it may require stronger anti-inflammatory drugs to be administered.",
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A femtosecond laser creates a stronger flap than a mechanical microkeratome. / Jae, Yong Kim; Myoung, Joon Kim; Kim, Tae-im; Choi, Hyun Jeung; Jhang, Ho Pak; Tchah, Hungwon.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.02.2006, p. 599-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - A femtosecond laser creates a stronger flap than a mechanical microkeratome

AU - Jae, Yong Kim

AU - Myoung, Joon Kim

AU - Kim, Tae-im

AU - Choi, Hyun Jeung

AU - Jhang, Ho Pak

AU - Tchah, Hungwon

PY - 2006/2/1

Y1 - 2006/2/1

N2 - PURPOSE. To compare corneal flaps made with a femtosecond (FS) laser with those made with a mechanical microkeratome (MM) in rabbits, measuring early postoperative inflammation and apoptosis and late postoperative adhesion strength. METHODS. Study 1 involved four treatment groups: one with flaps made only with the FS laser (FS group), one with flaps made with the FS laser followed by excimer laser ablation (FS+LASIK), one with flaps made with the MM, and one with flaps made with the MM followed by excimer laser ablation (MM+LASIK). The eyes were analyzed by histology and TUNEL staining for apoptosis at 4 and 24 hours. Study 2 involved two reference groups: an FS group and an MM group. Adhesion strength was measured with a tension meter 1 and 3 months later. RESULTS. Study 1: Inflammatory cell infiltration in the central cornea was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group at 4 and 24 hours (P < 0.05) and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Infiltration at the peripheral interface was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Study 2: At 1 and 3 months, 126.7 and 191.3 grams of force (gf) were needed to detach the flaps in the FS group, compared with 65 and 127.5 gf in the MM group, respectively. The grams of force needed was significantly higher in the FS group than in the MM group at 3 months (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The FS laser produces greater corneal stromal inflammation than the MM early postoperatively without any increase in apoptosis and stronger flap adhesion late postoperatively. Therefore, it may require stronger anti-inflammatory drugs to be administered.

AB - PURPOSE. To compare corneal flaps made with a femtosecond (FS) laser with those made with a mechanical microkeratome (MM) in rabbits, measuring early postoperative inflammation and apoptosis and late postoperative adhesion strength. METHODS. Study 1 involved four treatment groups: one with flaps made only with the FS laser (FS group), one with flaps made with the FS laser followed by excimer laser ablation (FS+LASIK), one with flaps made with the MM, and one with flaps made with the MM followed by excimer laser ablation (MM+LASIK). The eyes were analyzed by histology and TUNEL staining for apoptosis at 4 and 24 hours. Study 2 involved two reference groups: an FS group and an MM group. Adhesion strength was measured with a tension meter 1 and 3 months later. RESULTS. Study 1: Inflammatory cell infiltration in the central cornea was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group at 4 and 24 hours (P < 0.05) and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Infiltration at the peripheral interface was significantly greater in the FS group than in the MM group and was significantly greater in the FS+LASIK group than in the MM+LASIK group at 24 hours (P < 0.05). Study 2: At 1 and 3 months, 126.7 and 191.3 grams of force (gf) were needed to detach the flaps in the FS group, compared with 65 and 127.5 gf in the MM group, respectively. The grams of force needed was significantly higher in the FS group than in the MM group at 3 months (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. The FS laser produces greater corneal stromal inflammation than the MM early postoperatively without any increase in apoptosis and stronger flap adhesion late postoperatively. Therefore, it may require stronger anti-inflammatory drugs to be administered.

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