A global classroom evaluating the effectiveness of global virtual collaboration as a teaching tool in management education

Vas Taras, Dan V. Caprar, Daniel Rottig, Riikka M. Sarala, Norhayati Zakaria, Fang Zhao, Alfredo Jiménez, Charles Wankel, Weng Si Lei, Michael S. Minor, Pawel Bryla, Xavier Ordeñana, Alexander Bode, Anja Schuster, Erika Vaiginiene, Fabian Jintae Froese, Hanoku Bathula, Nilay Yajnik, Rico Baldegger, Victor Zengyu Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluate the effectiveness of global virtual student collaboration projects in international management education. Over 6,000 students from nearly 80 universities in 43 countries worked in global virtual teams for 2 months as part of their international management courses. Multisource longitudinal data were collected, including student and instructor feedback, course evaluations, assessment of changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors following the experiential project, and various indicators of individual and team performance. Drawing on experiential learning, social learning, and intergroup contact theories, the effectiveness of the experiential global virtual teambased approach in international management education was evaluated at the levels of reactions, learning, attitudes, behaviors, and performance. The findings show positive outcomes at each level, but also reveal challenges and limitations of using global virtual team projects for learning and education. Implications for international management education and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-435
Number of pages22
JournalAcademy of Management Learning and Education
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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