A longitudinal study of son and daughter preference among Chinese only-children from adolescence to adulthood

Sung won Kim, Vanessa L. Fong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this mixed-method longitudinal study, we examined the continuity of son preference and daughter preference from adolescence to adulthood, and investigated how perceptions of gender equity shape these preferences among 2,273 youth born in Dalian between 1979 and 1986 under the one-child policy. The majority expressed no preference in adolescence or adulthood. Results from multivariate analysis and the narratives of 23 participants revealed that child gender preferences in adolescence were predictive of later preferences in adulthood. Furthermore, in adolescence, child gender preferences were associated with individuals’ beliefs about gender as manifested in their attitudes towards women and employment, as well as their perceptions of parental and social gender biases against women. Our findings suggest that increasingly gender-egalitarian attitudes in urban China shape the child gender preferences of singleton youth in adolescence, and are likely to contribute to their later childbearing decisions, with important social and demographic implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalChina Journal
Volume71
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

adolescence
only child
adulthood
longitudinal study
gender
son preference
childbearing
multivariate analysis
equity
continuity
narrative
China
trend

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{26b3ba37147a409fa6fbadc24fcef105,
title = "A longitudinal study of son and daughter preference among Chinese only-children from adolescence to adulthood",
abstract = "In this mixed-method longitudinal study, we examined the continuity of son preference and daughter preference from adolescence to adulthood, and investigated how perceptions of gender equity shape these preferences among 2,273 youth born in Dalian between 1979 and 1986 under the one-child policy. The majority expressed no preference in adolescence or adulthood. Results from multivariate analysis and the narratives of 23 participants revealed that child gender preferences in adolescence were predictive of later preferences in adulthood. Furthermore, in adolescence, child gender preferences were associated with individuals’ beliefs about gender as manifested in their attitudes towards women and employment, as well as their perceptions of parental and social gender biases against women. Our findings suggest that increasingly gender-egalitarian attitudes in urban China shape the child gender preferences of singleton youth in adolescence, and are likely to contribute to their later childbearing decisions, with important social and demographic implications.",
author = "Kim, {Sung won} and Fong, {Vanessa L.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/674551",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1--24",
journal = "China Journal",
issn = "1324-9347",
publisher = "Australian National University",

}

A longitudinal study of son and daughter preference among Chinese only-children from adolescence to adulthood. / Kim, Sung won; Fong, Vanessa L.

In: China Journal, Vol. 71, 01.01.2014, p. 1-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal study of son and daughter preference among Chinese only-children from adolescence to adulthood

AU - Kim, Sung won

AU - Fong, Vanessa L.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - In this mixed-method longitudinal study, we examined the continuity of son preference and daughter preference from adolescence to adulthood, and investigated how perceptions of gender equity shape these preferences among 2,273 youth born in Dalian between 1979 and 1986 under the one-child policy. The majority expressed no preference in adolescence or adulthood. Results from multivariate analysis and the narratives of 23 participants revealed that child gender preferences in adolescence were predictive of later preferences in adulthood. Furthermore, in adolescence, child gender preferences were associated with individuals’ beliefs about gender as manifested in their attitudes towards women and employment, as well as their perceptions of parental and social gender biases against women. Our findings suggest that increasingly gender-egalitarian attitudes in urban China shape the child gender preferences of singleton youth in adolescence, and are likely to contribute to their later childbearing decisions, with important social and demographic implications.

AB - In this mixed-method longitudinal study, we examined the continuity of son preference and daughter preference from adolescence to adulthood, and investigated how perceptions of gender equity shape these preferences among 2,273 youth born in Dalian between 1979 and 1986 under the one-child policy. The majority expressed no preference in adolescence or adulthood. Results from multivariate analysis and the narratives of 23 participants revealed that child gender preferences in adolescence were predictive of later preferences in adulthood. Furthermore, in adolescence, child gender preferences were associated with individuals’ beliefs about gender as manifested in their attitudes towards women and employment, as well as their perceptions of parental and social gender biases against women. Our findings suggest that increasingly gender-egalitarian attitudes in urban China shape the child gender preferences of singleton youth in adolescence, and are likely to contribute to their later childbearing decisions, with important social and demographic implications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940644610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940644610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/674551

DO - 10.1086/674551

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84940644610

VL - 71

SP - 1

EP - 24

JO - China Journal

JF - China Journal

SN - 1324-9347

ER -