A Microfluidics-based Pulpal Arteriole Blood Flow Phantom for Validation of Doppler Ultrasound Devices in Pulpal Blood Flow Velocity Measurement

Dohyun Kim, Sungho Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Recently, Doppler ultrasound has been used for the measurement of pulpal blood flow in human teeth. However, the reliability of this method has not been verified. In this study, we developed a model to simulate arteriole blood flow within the dental pulp by using microfluidics. This arteriole simulator, or flow phantom, was used to determine the reliability of measurements obtained by using a Doppler ultrasound device. Methods A microfluidic chip was fabricated by using the soft lithography technique, and blood-mimicking fluid was pumped through the channel by a microfluidic system. A Doppler ultrasound device was used for the measurement of flow velocity. The peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities obtained from the phantom and the Doppler ultrasound device were compared by using linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to evaluate the velocity differences between the flow generated by the phantom and the flow measurements made with the Doppler ultrasound device. Results The microfluidic system was able to generate the flow profiles as intended, and the fluid flow could be monitored and controlled by the software program. There were excellent linear correlations between the peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities of the phantom and those of the Doppler ultrasound device (r = 0.94–0.996, P < .001). However, the velocities were overestimated by the Doppler ultrasound device. Conclusions This phantom provides opportunities for research and education involving the Doppler ultrasound technique in dentistry. Although Doppler ultrasound can be an effective tool for the measurement of pulpal blood flow velocity, it is essential to validate and calibrate the device before clinical use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1660-1666
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume42
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

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Doppler Ultrasonography
Microfluidics
Blood Flow Velocity
Arterioles
Equipment and Supplies
Dental Pulp
Dentistry
Linear Models
Tooth
Software
Regression Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "A Microfluidics-based Pulpal Arteriole Blood Flow Phantom for Validation of Doppler Ultrasound Devices in Pulpal Blood Flow Velocity Measurement",
abstract = "Introduction Recently, Doppler ultrasound has been used for the measurement of pulpal blood flow in human teeth. However, the reliability of this method has not been verified. In this study, we developed a model to simulate arteriole blood flow within the dental pulp by using microfluidics. This arteriole simulator, or flow phantom, was used to determine the reliability of measurements obtained by using a Doppler ultrasound device. Methods A microfluidic chip was fabricated by using the soft lithography technique, and blood-mimicking fluid was pumped through the channel by a microfluidic system. A Doppler ultrasound device was used for the measurement of flow velocity. The peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities obtained from the phantom and the Doppler ultrasound device were compared by using linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to evaluate the velocity differences between the flow generated by the phantom and the flow measurements made with the Doppler ultrasound device. Results The microfluidic system was able to generate the flow profiles as intended, and the fluid flow could be monitored and controlled by the software program. There were excellent linear correlations between the peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities of the phantom and those of the Doppler ultrasound device (r = 0.94–0.996, P < .001). However, the velocities were overestimated by the Doppler ultrasound device. Conclusions This phantom provides opportunities for research and education involving the Doppler ultrasound technique in dentistry. Although Doppler ultrasound can be an effective tool for the measurement of pulpal blood flow velocity, it is essential to validate and calibrate the device before clinical use.",
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N2 - Introduction Recently, Doppler ultrasound has been used for the measurement of pulpal blood flow in human teeth. However, the reliability of this method has not been verified. In this study, we developed a model to simulate arteriole blood flow within the dental pulp by using microfluidics. This arteriole simulator, or flow phantom, was used to determine the reliability of measurements obtained by using a Doppler ultrasound device. Methods A microfluidic chip was fabricated by using the soft lithography technique, and blood-mimicking fluid was pumped through the channel by a microfluidic system. A Doppler ultrasound device was used for the measurement of flow velocity. The peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities obtained from the phantom and the Doppler ultrasound device were compared by using linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to evaluate the velocity differences between the flow generated by the phantom and the flow measurements made with the Doppler ultrasound device. Results The microfluidic system was able to generate the flow profiles as intended, and the fluid flow could be monitored and controlled by the software program. There were excellent linear correlations between the peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities of the phantom and those of the Doppler ultrasound device (r = 0.94–0.996, P < .001). However, the velocities were overestimated by the Doppler ultrasound device. Conclusions This phantom provides opportunities for research and education involving the Doppler ultrasound technique in dentistry. Although Doppler ultrasound can be an effective tool for the measurement of pulpal blood flow velocity, it is essential to validate and calibrate the device before clinical use.

AB - Introduction Recently, Doppler ultrasound has been used for the measurement of pulpal blood flow in human teeth. However, the reliability of this method has not been verified. In this study, we developed a model to simulate arteriole blood flow within the dental pulp by using microfluidics. This arteriole simulator, or flow phantom, was used to determine the reliability of measurements obtained by using a Doppler ultrasound device. Methods A microfluidic chip was fabricated by using the soft lithography technique, and blood-mimicking fluid was pumped through the channel by a microfluidic system. A Doppler ultrasound device was used for the measurement of flow velocity. The peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities obtained from the phantom and the Doppler ultrasound device were compared by using linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to evaluate the velocity differences between the flow generated by the phantom and the flow measurements made with the Doppler ultrasound device. Results The microfluidic system was able to generate the flow profiles as intended, and the fluid flow could be monitored and controlled by the software program. There were excellent linear correlations between the peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities of the phantom and those of the Doppler ultrasound device (r = 0.94–0.996, P < .001). However, the velocities were overestimated by the Doppler ultrasound device. Conclusions This phantom provides opportunities for research and education involving the Doppler ultrasound technique in dentistry. Although Doppler ultrasound can be an effective tool for the measurement of pulpal blood flow velocity, it is essential to validate and calibrate the device before clinical use.

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