A predictive model for the level of sIgA based on IgG levels following the oral administration of antigens expressed in Sacchromyces cerevisiae

Jae Shin Sung, Won Shin Seung, Jin Choi Eun, Yong Lee Deog, Min Ahn Jeong, Sik Yang Moon, Suk Jang Yong, Sang Yoo Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oral vaccination may be the most efficient way of inducing an immune response at the remote mucosal site through the common mucosal immune network. Antigen-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) is the major immunoglobulin type generally detected in the secretions of experimental animals following an effective oral immunization. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causing disease in the lung of pig initially interacts, colonizes, and infects the host tissues at the mucosal surface of the respiratory tract. Also, importantly for A. pleuropneumoniae protection, the quantity of sIgA in the lung had merits associated with the mucosal immunity. However, there is no simple method to monitor the level of sIgA as an indicator for the induction of local immune responses by an oral vaccination in the target tissue. Therefore, the relationship between sIgA and IgG was analyzed to evaluate the induction of local immune responses by an oral immunization with Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the apxIA and apxIIA genes of A. pleuropneumoniae in this study. The correlation coefficient of determination (r2 × 100) for paired samples in both vaccinated and control groups showed a significant positive-relationship between IgG in sera and sIgA in the lung or intestine. These results indicated that IgG antibody titers in sera could be useful to indirectly predict local immune response, and sIgA, in the lung or intestine to evaluate the efficacy of an oral vaccination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-309
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of veterinary science
Volume6
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1

Fingerprint

oral vaccination
Secretory Immunoglobulin A
oral administration
Oral Administration
Immunoglobulin G
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae
antigens
Antigens
immune response
lungs
Vaccination
intestines
Lung
Intestines
Immunization
mucosal immunity
Mucosal Immunity
respiratory system
respiratory tract diseases
immunoglobulins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Sung, Jae Shin ; Seung, Won Shin ; Eun, Jin Choi ; Deog, Yong Lee ; Jeong, Min Ahn ; Moon, Sik Yang ; Yong, Suk Jang ; Han, Sang Yoo. / A predictive model for the level of sIgA based on IgG levels following the oral administration of antigens expressed in Sacchromyces cerevisiae. In: Journal of veterinary science. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 305-309.
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abstract = "Oral vaccination may be the most efficient way of inducing an immune response at the remote mucosal site through the common mucosal immune network. Antigen-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) is the major immunoglobulin type generally detected in the secretions of experimental animals following an effective oral immunization. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causing disease in the lung of pig initially interacts, colonizes, and infects the host tissues at the mucosal surface of the respiratory tract. Also, importantly for A. pleuropneumoniae protection, the quantity of sIgA in the lung had merits associated with the mucosal immunity. However, there is no simple method to monitor the level of sIgA as an indicator for the induction of local immune responses by an oral vaccination in the target tissue. Therefore, the relationship between sIgA and IgG was analyzed to evaluate the induction of local immune responses by an oral immunization with Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the apxIA and apxIIA genes of A. pleuropneumoniae in this study. The correlation coefficient of determination (r2 × 100) for paired samples in both vaccinated and control groups showed a significant positive-relationship between IgG in sera and sIgA in the lung or intestine. These results indicated that IgG antibody titers in sera could be useful to indirectly predict local immune response, and sIgA, in the lung or intestine to evaluate the efficacy of an oral vaccination.",
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A predictive model for the level of sIgA based on IgG levels following the oral administration of antigens expressed in Sacchromyces cerevisiae. / Sung, Jae Shin; Seung, Won Shin; Eun, Jin Choi; Deog, Yong Lee; Jeong, Min Ahn; Moon, Sik Yang; Yong, Suk Jang; Han, Sang Yoo.

In: Journal of veterinary science, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 305-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sung, Jae Shin

AU - Seung, Won Shin

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AU - Deog, Yong Lee

AU - Jeong, Min Ahn

AU - Moon, Sik Yang

AU - Yong, Suk Jang

AU - Han, Sang Yoo

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