A profile of individuals with anti-tobacco message fatigue

Jiyeon So, Lucy Popova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Message fatigue, a phenomenon of being tired of repeated exposure to messages promoting the same health behavior, may reduce the effectiveness of anti-tobacco messages, such as warning labels. As an initial step towards understanding the phenomenon, we examined predictors of anti-tobacco message fatigue. Methods: An online study (N = 1838) involving a non-probability sample of nonsmokers and smokers in the United States assessed anti-tobacco message fatigue and individual-level factors including demographic variables and smoking status. General linear models were used to analyze the data. Results: The multivariable results show that individuals who were younger, male, and had higher income and education reported higher levels of anti-tobacco message fatigue. African Americans reported significantly lower levels of message fatigue than other racial groups. Current smokers reported greater message fatigue than transitioning smokers and nonsmokers. Among current smokers, those with greater nicotine dependence reported higher levels of anti-tobacco message fatigue. Conclusions: These findings underscore the importance of segmenting the audience based on their levels of message fatigue and using more novel message strategies and delivery methods to influence populations with relatively higher levels of anti-tobacco message fatigue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan

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fatigue
nicotine
Tobacco
Fatigue
Tobacco Use Disorder
Health Behavior
demographic factors
linear model
health behavior
African Americans
smoking
Linear Models
Smoking
Demography
Education
income
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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A profile of individuals with anti-tobacco message fatigue. / So, Jiyeon; Popova, Lucy.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 109-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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