A prospective study of the association between total sleep duration and incident hypertension

Dhananjay Yadav, Dae Sung Hyun, Songvogue Ahn, Sangbaek Koh, Jang Young Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate total sleep duration as a potential risk factor for the development of hypertension after a mean of 2.6 years of follow-up. The study participants comprised 1715 Korean adults aged 40 to 70 years. The participants were without hypertension at baseline (2005–2008) and during follow-up (2008–2011) to determine the incident cases of hypertension. Based on a self-reported questionnaire, the individuals were stratified according to total sleep duration (<6 hours, 6–7.9 hours, 8–9.9 hours, ≥10 hours). Hypertension was defined according to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) guidelines. After an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 164 (9.56%) participants developed hypertension. In multivariate adjusted models, the odds ratio for new-onset hypertension was 1.71 (95% confidence interval, 1.01–2.89) in participants with a short sleep duration (<6 hours) compared with those who reported 6 to 7.9 hours of sleep. Long sleep duration (more than 8 hours) did not have any significant difference on incident hypertension. Among middle-aged and elderly Korean adults, short sleepers were independently associated with a higher risk of developing hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550-557
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 1

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Sleep
Prospective Studies
Hypertension
Odds Ratio
Guidelines
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate total sleep duration as a potential risk factor for the development of hypertension after a mean of 2.6 years of follow-up. The study participants comprised 1715 Korean adults aged 40 to 70 years. The participants were without hypertension at baseline (2005–2008) and during follow-up (2008–2011) to determine the incident cases of hypertension. Based on a self-reported questionnaire, the individuals were stratified according to total sleep duration (<6 hours, 6–7.9 hours, 8–9.9 hours, ≥10 hours). Hypertension was defined according to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) guidelines. After an average of 2.6 years of follow-up, 164 (9.56{\%}) participants developed hypertension. In multivariate adjusted models, the odds ratio for new-onset hypertension was 1.71 (95{\%} confidence interval, 1.01–2.89) in participants with a short sleep duration (<6 hours) compared with those who reported 6 to 7.9 hours of sleep. Long sleep duration (more than 8 hours) did not have any significant difference on incident hypertension. Among middle-aged and elderly Korean adults, short sleepers were independently associated with a higher risk of developing hypertension.",
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A prospective study of the association between total sleep duration and incident hypertension. / Yadav, Dhananjay; Hyun, Dae Sung; Ahn, Songvogue; Koh, Sangbaek; Kim, Jang Young.

In: Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 550-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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