A simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A plugging method of the internal inguinal floor for patients with patent processus vaginalis

Dong Hoon Lee, Kyo Chul Koo, Seung Hwan Lee, Byungha Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose We introduce a simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. We developed the inguinal hernia prevention procedure based on our prior study. Patent processus vaginalis is an independent predictor of inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods We reviewed 74 patients (98 groins) with patent processus vaginalis during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between May 2007 and April 2013. Of these patients 38 (47 groins) did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure and 36 (51 groins) were treated with this procedure. For the inguinal hernia prevention the lateral side internal inguinal floor of the patent processus vaginalis was incised and dissected along the spermatic cord. Hemostatic agents were plugged into the end of the dissected canal. After plugging, the internal inguinal floor was closed. We compared the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernia between the 2 groups. Results Among the 47 groins of the patients who did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure, postoperative inguinal hernia occurred in 16 groins (34.0%) and developed by a mean of 13.8 ± 8.5 months. In contrast, none of the patients who underwent the inguinal hernia prevention procedure experienced postoperative inguinal hernia during the followup of 11.8 ± 6.2 months. This inguinal hernia prevention procedure required approximately 3 extra minutes. During followup there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications related to the inguinal hernia prevention procedure. Conclusions Using our simple inguinal hernia prevention procedure, the preventive effect was remarkable. However, studies in a larger patient population with a longer followup should be performed to prove the ultimate clinical impact of this inguinal hernia prevention procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-472
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume191
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Groin
Inguinal Hernia
Prostatectomy
Incisional Hernia
Spermatic Cord
Intraoperative Complications
Hemostatics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

@article{8783419c8cd642079da2655abc1b9419,
title = "A simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A plugging method of the internal inguinal floor for patients with patent processus vaginalis",
abstract = "Purpose We introduce a simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. We developed the inguinal hernia prevention procedure based on our prior study. Patent processus vaginalis is an independent predictor of inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods We reviewed 74 patients (98 groins) with patent processus vaginalis during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between May 2007 and April 2013. Of these patients 38 (47 groins) did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure and 36 (51 groins) were treated with this procedure. For the inguinal hernia prevention the lateral side internal inguinal floor of the patent processus vaginalis was incised and dissected along the spermatic cord. Hemostatic agents were plugged into the end of the dissected canal. After plugging, the internal inguinal floor was closed. We compared the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernia between the 2 groups. Results Among the 47 groins of the patients who did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure, postoperative inguinal hernia occurred in 16 groins (34.0{\%}) and developed by a mean of 13.8 ± 8.5 months. In contrast, none of the patients who underwent the inguinal hernia prevention procedure experienced postoperative inguinal hernia during the followup of 11.8 ± 6.2 months. This inguinal hernia prevention procedure required approximately 3 extra minutes. During followup there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications related to the inguinal hernia prevention procedure. Conclusions Using our simple inguinal hernia prevention procedure, the preventive effect was remarkable. However, studies in a larger patient population with a longer followup should be performed to prove the ultimate clinical impact of this inguinal hernia prevention procedure.",
author = "Lee, {Dong Hoon} and Koo, {Kyo Chul} and Lee, {Seung Hwan} and Byungha Chung",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.juro.2013.09.035",
language = "English",
volume = "191",
pages = "468--472",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

T2 - A plugging method of the internal inguinal floor for patients with patent processus vaginalis

AU - Lee, Dong Hoon

AU - Koo, Kyo Chul

AU - Lee, Seung Hwan

AU - Chung, Byungha

PY - 2014/2/1

Y1 - 2014/2/1

N2 - Purpose We introduce a simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. We developed the inguinal hernia prevention procedure based on our prior study. Patent processus vaginalis is an independent predictor of inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods We reviewed 74 patients (98 groins) with patent processus vaginalis during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between May 2007 and April 2013. Of these patients 38 (47 groins) did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure and 36 (51 groins) were treated with this procedure. For the inguinal hernia prevention the lateral side internal inguinal floor of the patent processus vaginalis was incised and dissected along the spermatic cord. Hemostatic agents were plugged into the end of the dissected canal. After plugging, the internal inguinal floor was closed. We compared the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernia between the 2 groups. Results Among the 47 groins of the patients who did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure, postoperative inguinal hernia occurred in 16 groins (34.0%) and developed by a mean of 13.8 ± 8.5 months. In contrast, none of the patients who underwent the inguinal hernia prevention procedure experienced postoperative inguinal hernia during the followup of 11.8 ± 6.2 months. This inguinal hernia prevention procedure required approximately 3 extra minutes. During followup there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications related to the inguinal hernia prevention procedure. Conclusions Using our simple inguinal hernia prevention procedure, the preventive effect was remarkable. However, studies in a larger patient population with a longer followup should be performed to prove the ultimate clinical impact of this inguinal hernia prevention procedure.

AB - Purpose We introduce a simple procedure to prevent postoperative inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. We developed the inguinal hernia prevention procedure based on our prior study. Patent processus vaginalis is an independent predictor of inguinal hernia after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods We reviewed 74 patients (98 groins) with patent processus vaginalis during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between May 2007 and April 2013. Of these patients 38 (47 groins) did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure and 36 (51 groins) were treated with this procedure. For the inguinal hernia prevention the lateral side internal inguinal floor of the patent processus vaginalis was incised and dissected along the spermatic cord. Hemostatic agents were plugged into the end of the dissected canal. After plugging, the internal inguinal floor was closed. We compared the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernia between the 2 groups. Results Among the 47 groins of the patients who did not undergo the inguinal hernia prevention procedure, postoperative inguinal hernia occurred in 16 groins (34.0%) and developed by a mean of 13.8 ± 8.5 months. In contrast, none of the patients who underwent the inguinal hernia prevention procedure experienced postoperative inguinal hernia during the followup of 11.8 ± 6.2 months. This inguinal hernia prevention procedure required approximately 3 extra minutes. During followup there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications related to the inguinal hernia prevention procedure. Conclusions Using our simple inguinal hernia prevention procedure, the preventive effect was remarkable. However, studies in a larger patient population with a longer followup should be performed to prove the ultimate clinical impact of this inguinal hernia prevention procedure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84891925987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84891925987&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.juro.2013.09.035

DO - 10.1016/j.juro.2013.09.035

M3 - Article

C2 - 24071480

AN - SCOPUS:84891925987

VL - 191

SP - 468

EP - 472

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 2

ER -