A story of the national calculus curriculum: how culture, research, and policy compete and compromise in shaping the calculus curriculum in South Korea

Hyunkyoung Yoon, Younggon Bae, Woong Lim, Oh Nam Kwon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper we examine changes to the national calculus curriculum of South Korea, where mathematics performance often serves as the mark of academic excellence. We describe relevant cultural traditions of mathematics education in South Korea, including the history of curricular changes in calculus at the secondary level. We then investigate how public discourse concerning a calculus curriculum revision is formed through issue framing, and analyze the public discourse among stakeholders in calculus education in South Korea. In addition, we present an analysis of the revised calculus curriculum at the high school level in relation to the issues raised by stakeholder groups. Further, we reflect on how culture, research, and policy can collectively inform curricular changes and educational policies. Last, we discuss the role of mathematics education research in facilitating the balanced formation of public discourse and in supporting teachers' professional autonomy to provide meaningful calculus education to students. The findings suggest a need for building clear boundaries of roles and responsibilities of stakeholders in developing and revising national curricula, and for using research evidence in curriculum reform.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)663-677
Number of pages15
JournalZDM - International Journal on Mathematics Education
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jun

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, FIZ Karlsruhe.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mathematics(all)
  • Education

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A story of the national calculus curriculum: how culture, research, and policy compete and compromise in shaping the calculus curriculum in South Korea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this