Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause

Jae Sun Uhm, Jong Chan Youn, Hye Jeong Lee, Junbeom Park, Jin Kyu Park, ChiYoung Shim, Geu Ru Hong, Boyoung Joung, huinam pak, Moon Hyoung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥ 1.1 cm. Results In 49 patients (age 49.9 ± 15.9 years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2 ± 16.6 years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p = 0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p = 0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p = 0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p = 0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. Conclusions An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20755
Pages (from-to)285-291
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume197
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 5

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Papillary Muscles
Sudden Cardiac Death
Hypertrophy
Coronary Angiography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Uhm, Jae Sun ; Youn, Jong Chan ; Lee, Hye Jeong ; Park, Junbeom ; Park, Jin Kyu ; Shim, ChiYoung ; Hong, Geu Ru ; Joung, Boyoung ; pak, huinam ; Lee, Moon Hyoung. / Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2015 ; Vol. 197. pp. 285-291.
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title = "Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause",
abstract = "Background The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥ 1.1 cm. Results In 49 patients (age 49.9 ± 15.9 years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2 ± 16.6 years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5{\%} and 7.8{\%}, respectively; p = 0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1{\%}, p = 0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2{\%}, known-cause 2.1{\%}, p = 0.010; no SCA group 1.0{\%}, p = 0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. Conclusions An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause.",
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Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. / Uhm, Jae Sun; Youn, Jong Chan; Lee, Hye Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin Kyu; Shim, ChiYoung; Hong, Geu Ru; Joung, Boyoung; pak, huinam; Lee, Moon Hyoung.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 197, 20755, 05.08.2015, p. 285-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause

AU - Uhm, Jae Sun

AU - Youn, Jong Chan

AU - Lee, Hye Jeong

AU - Park, Junbeom

AU - Park, Jin Kyu

AU - Shim, ChiYoung

AU - Hong, Geu Ru

AU - Joung, Boyoung

AU - pak, huinam

AU - Lee, Moon Hyoung

PY - 2015/8/5

Y1 - 2015/8/5

N2 - Background The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥ 1.1 cm. Results In 49 patients (age 49.9 ± 15.9 years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2 ± 16.6 years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p = 0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p = 0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p = 0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p = 0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. Conclusions An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause.

AB - Background The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥ 1.1 cm. Results In 49 patients (age 49.9 ± 15.9 years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2 ± 16.6 years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p = 0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p = 0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p = 0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p = 0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. Conclusions An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause.

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