Accumulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials on the filters utilized in bottled mineral-water facilities

Woosik Shin, Sungwook Choung, Jeong Hee Han, Weon Shik Han, Sodam Jeon, Jong Sik Ryu, Byung Uck Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bottled mineral-water is typically produced through filtering processes of groundwater in many countries. Although naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) are present in ambient groundwater, the accumulation of NORMs to filters used by bottled mineral-water plants and their total radioactivity was never studied. The radioactivity of NORMs in water and filter samples were determined for a total of thirteen bottled mineral-water facilities in Korea. The NORM levels were quite low in raw water (i.e., groundwater before filtered), and uranium and radon contents were lowered after filtering. However, minor increases of uranium concentration were observed after the treatment processes in two mineral-water plants used only membrane filters. The measured surface radiations sharply increased at the filters installed at the front of water treatment processes regardless of filter types. Diverse radionuclides including lead and polonium were found inside these filters with comparatively high radioactivity. In particular, the estimated total radioactivity of one of the used filters exceeded 1 Bq g−1 and 1000 kBq yr−1 that are the guideline values regulated by the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission in Korea for by-products occurring after any treatment processes. The elevated radiation may result in potential risk during bottling, transport, and disposal processes, therefore, proper management and disposal of the filters should be considered in bottled mineral-water treatment facilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-161
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Geochemistry
Volume85
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 1

Fingerprint

Mineral Waters
Radioactive materials
Radioactivity
Minerals
filter
Groundwater
radioactivity
Uranium
Water
Water treatment
Polonium
Radiation
Radon
groundwater
uranium
water treatment
Radioisotopes
polonium
Byproducts
mineral water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Shin, Woosik ; Choung, Sungwook ; Han, Jeong Hee ; Han, Weon Shik ; Jeon, Sodam ; Ryu, Jong Sik ; Chang, Byung Uck. / Accumulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials on the filters utilized in bottled mineral-water facilities. In: Applied Geochemistry. 2017 ; Vol. 85. pp. 154-161.
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Accumulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials on the filters utilized in bottled mineral-water facilities. / Shin, Woosik; Choung, Sungwook; Han, Jeong Hee; Han, Weon Shik; Jeon, Sodam; Ryu, Jong Sik; Chang, Byung Uck.

In: Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 85, 01.10.2017, p. 154-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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