Additive effects of phrase boundary on english accented vowels

Eun Kyung Lee, Jennifer Cole, Heejin Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates cumulative effects of strengthening and lengthening on English vowels across two prominencebearing prosodic factors, phrasal accent and prosodic phrase boundary. F1, F2 and duration measures are compared across vowels in three prosodic contexts: ip-medial unaccented, ipmedial accented, and ip-final accented. The results show that for most vowels there is only one degree of vowel strengthening, conditioned by phrasal accent, without any additive strengthening effect of prosodic phrase boundary. Lengthening is observed in both accent and added phrase boundary conditions, and the effect is consistently cumulative for at least some vowels, suggesting a gradient increase of duration as a function of the strength of prosodic structure. This finding also provides compelling evidence that strengthening and lengthening effects are two independent mechanisms that serve to mark prosodically strong positions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication3rd International Conference on Speech Prosody 2006
EditorsR. Hoffmann, H. Mixdorff
PublisherInternational Speech Communications Association
ISBN (Electronic)9780000000002
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event3rd International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2006 - Dresden, Germany
Duration: 2006 May 22006 May 5

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody
ISSN (Print)2333-2042

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Speech Prosody, SP 2006
CountryGermany
CityDresden
Period06/5/206/5/5

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2006 Proceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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