Adolescent Experiences of Clinician–Patient HIV/STI Communication in Primary Care

David Córdova, Frania Mendoza Lua, Lauretta Ovadje, Kathryn Fessler, José A. Bauermeister, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Michael G. Vaughn, Youth Leadership Council

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effective clinician–patient communication is linked to positive patient health outcomes in adults, yet the research on adolescent populations remains limited. We describe adolescent experiences of clinician–patient HIV/STI communication through qualitative interviews with predominantly African-American adolescent women from a youth-centered primary care clinic. Participants described acknowledging clinicians are professionals, the importance of confidentiality to foster clinician–adolescent communication, and calling for clinician-initiated HIV/STI communication. Adolescents expressed the necessity for clinicians to engage youth in these challenging conversations through an open and understanding approach. Additionally, adolescents described experiences of perceived judgment and uncomfortableness from clinicians, and non-disclosure of HIV/STI risk behaviors to their clinician. Findings underscore the adolescents’ desire to engage in HIV/STI communication with healthcare providers, while highlighting important strategies for clinicians. Results can inform health communication research and practice, and the development of interventions aimed at increasing clinician–adolescent HIV/STI communication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1177-1183
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Communication
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep 2

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan, Vivian A. and James L. Curtis School of Social Work Research and Training Center (Grant No. 23665). Preparation of this manuscript was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (Grant No. 1 R03DA041891 01A1), National Institute of Mental Health (Grant No. R25 MH067127) and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Loan Repayment Program (Grant No. L60 MD006269).

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan, Vivian A. and James L. Curtis School of Social Work Research and Training Center (Grant No. 23665). Preparation of this manuscript was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (Grant No. 1 R03DA041891 01A1), National Institute of Mental Health (Grant No. R25 MH067127) and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Loan Repayment Program (Grant No. L60 MD006269). This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Vice President for Research at the University of Michigan, Vivian A. and James L. Curtis School of Social Work Research and Training Center (Grant No. 23665). Preparation of this manuscript was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (Grant No. 1 R03DA041891 01A1), National Institute of Mental Health (Grant No. R25 MH067127) and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Loan Repayment Program (Grant No. L60 MD006269).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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