Air pollution and short-term clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction

Other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ambient air pollution is well-known to be a serious risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, stroke, and death. However, the association between air pollutants (AP) exposure and short-term clinical outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients (pts) has not been elucidated well. In the present study, 37 880 AMI pts were enrolled from October 2005 to December 2013 in a nationwide large-scale, prospective, multicentre Korea AMI registry (KAMIR registry; http://www.kamir.or.kr). We obtained data on AP (e.g., NO2, SO2, CO, O3 and PM10) from the Korean National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER; http://www.nier.go.kr). Clinical endpoints included death, recurrent myocardial infarction (Re-MI), any revascularization and composite of all-cause death and Re-MI. Exposure to AP is defined as the average exposure to AP within 24 hours before AMI admission. We observed that a 0.01 part per million (ppm) increase in NO2 concentration, 0.001 ppm increase in SO2 concentration, and 0.1 ppm increase in CO concentration each increased the risk of total death by 9.7% (95% CI, 6.2%-13.4%), 1.9% (95% CI, 0.3%-3.6%), and 2.1% (95% CI, 0.5%-3.9%), respectively. Exceptionally, O3 decreased the risk of total death by 0.6% (95% CI −0.2% to −1.0%) per 0.01 ppm increase. PM10 was not related to any cardiovascular events. AP were each stratified into five quintiles according to ranges of AP levels. After adjusting analysis for risk variables, only high quintiles (Q4, Q5) of NO2 were positively associated with total death, cardiac death and MI, while SO2, CO, O3 and PM10 were shown to be not related to any cardiovascular events at all levels. In AMI patients, each AP and its concentration has shown a different effect to short-term mortality and cardiovascular events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-638
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

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Air Pollution
Air Pollutants
Myocardial Infarction
Carbon Monoxide
Registries
Korea
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) investigators. / Air pollution and short-term clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction. In: Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology. 2017 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 631-638.
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title = "Air pollution and short-term clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction",
abstract = "Ambient air pollution is well-known to be a serious risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, stroke, and death. However, the association between air pollutants (AP) exposure and short-term clinical outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients (pts) has not been elucidated well. In the present study, 37 880 AMI pts were enrolled from October 2005 to December 2013 in a nationwide large-scale, prospective, multicentre Korea AMI registry (KAMIR registry; http://www.kamir.or.kr). We obtained data on AP (e.g., NO2, SO2, CO, O3 and PM10) from the Korean National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER; http://www.nier.go.kr). Clinical endpoints included death, recurrent myocardial infarction (Re-MI), any revascularization and composite of all-cause death and Re-MI. Exposure to AP is defined as the average exposure to AP within 24 hours before AMI admission. We observed that a 0.01 part per million (ppm) increase in NO2 concentration, 0.001 ppm increase in SO2 concentration, and 0.1 ppm increase in CO concentration each increased the risk of total death by 9.7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 6.2{\%}-13.4{\%}), 1.9{\%} (95{\%} CI, 0.3{\%}-3.6{\%}), and 2.1{\%} (95{\%} CI, 0.5{\%}-3.9{\%}), respectively. Exceptionally, O3 decreased the risk of total death by 0.6{\%} (95{\%} CI −0.2{\%} to −1.0{\%}) per 0.01 ppm increase. PM10 was not related to any cardiovascular events. AP were each stratified into five quintiles according to ranges of AP levels. After adjusting analysis for risk variables, only high quintiles (Q4, Q5) of NO2 were positively associated with total death, cardiac death and MI, while SO2, CO, O3 and PM10 were shown to be not related to any cardiovascular events at all levels. In AMI patients, each AP and its concentration has shown a different effect to short-term mortality and cardiovascular events.",
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Air pollution and short-term clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction. / Other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) investigators.

In: Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, Vol. 44, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 631-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Air pollution and short-term clinical outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction

AU - Other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) investigators

AU - Lee, Min Woo

AU - Choi, Byoung Geol

AU - Kim, Suhng Wook

AU - Rha, Seung Woon

AU - Shim, Min Suk

AU - Kim, Dae Jin

AU - Seo, Hong Seog

AU - Oh, Dong Joo

AU - Jeong, Myung ho

AU - Kim, Yong Hoon

AU - Kim, Young Jo

AU - Kim, Chong Jin

AU - Cho, Myeong Chan

AU - Ahn, Youngkeun

AU - Kim, Jong Hyun

AU - Chae, Shung Chull

AU - Hur, Seung Ho

AU - Seong, In Whan

AU - Hong, Taek Jong

AU - Choi, Dong Hoon

AU - Choi, Donghoon

AU - Rhew, Jae Young

AU - Kim, Doo Il

AU - Chae, In Ho

AU - Yoon, Jung Han

AU - Yoon, Junghan

AU - Kim, Byung Ok

AU - Lee, Myoung Yong

AU - Kim, Kee Sik

AU - Hwang, Jin Yong

AU - Oh, Seok Kyu

AU - Lee, Nae Hee

AU - Jeong, Kyoung Tae

AU - Tahk, Seung Jea

AU - Bae, Jang Ho

AU - Park, Keum Soo

AU - Han, Kyoo Rok

AU - Ahn, Tae Hoon

AU - Kim, Moo Hyun

AU - Yang, Joo Young

AU - Rhim, Chong Yun

AU - Gwon, Hyeon Cheol

AU - Park, Seong Wook

AU - Koh, Young Youp

AU - Joo, Seung Jae

AU - Kim, Soo Joong

AU - Jin, Dong Kyu

AU - Cho, Jin Man

AU - Chung, Wook Sung

AU - Jang, Yangsoo

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

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