Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma

Jae Woo Kwon, Sae Hoon Kim, Tae Bum Kim, Sang Heon Kim, Heung Woo Park, Yoon Seok Chang, An Soo Jang, You Sook Cho, Dong Ho Nahm, Jungwon Park, Ho Joo Yoon, Young Joo Cho, Byoung Whui Choi, Hee Bom Moon, Sang Heon Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but the effect of obesity on airway hyperresponsiveness (AFHR) or airway inflammation in asthma is not clear. This study evaluated the relationship between obesity and asthma, assessing aspects of symptoms, AHR, and severity. Methods: In total, 852 patients with asthma diagnosed by asthma specialists based on AHR as confirmed by a methacholine bronchial provocation test, were enrolled from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA) adult asthma cohort. The intensity of AHR was assessed by the concentration of methacholine needed to cause a 20% decrease in FEV1 (PC20). Patients were classified into four categories based on body mass index (BMI): underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Results: BMI was negatively correlated with FEV1 (l), FVC (l), and FEV1/FVC (%) in lung function tests. The prevalence of wheezing increased with higher BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, medication history, and PC20 (p < 0.0001). logPC20 was lower in the normal weight group compared with the overweight group (p = 0.003). The risk of moderate or severe AHR (PC 20 ≤ 4 mg/ml) decreased with increased BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and medication history (p = 0.035). Conclusions: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but obesity in asthmatic patients is negatively correlated with the intensity of AHR and is not related to asthma severity. Obesity is positively related with the prevalence of wheezing but negatively related to AHR in asthmatic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-193
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Volume159
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Asthma
Obesity
Body Mass Index
Methacholine Chloride
Respiratory Sounds
Smoking
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Weights and Measures
Thinness
Respiratory Function Tests
Korea
Population
Inflammation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Kwon, Jae Woo ; Kim, Sae Hoon ; Kim, Tae Bum ; Kim, Sang Heon ; Park, Heung Woo ; Chang, Yoon Seok ; Jang, An Soo ; Cho, You Sook ; Nahm, Dong Ho ; Park, Jungwon ; Yoon, Ho Joo ; Cho, Young Joo ; Choi, Byoung Whui ; Moon, Hee Bom ; Cho, Sang Heon. / Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma. In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 159, No. 2. pp. 187-193.
@article{bb5be3852e65452c8e2f01d7fef20c3b,
title = "Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma",
abstract = "Background: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but the effect of obesity on airway hyperresponsiveness (AFHR) or airway inflammation in asthma is not clear. This study evaluated the relationship between obesity and asthma, assessing aspects of symptoms, AHR, and severity. Methods: In total, 852 patients with asthma diagnosed by asthma specialists based on AHR as confirmed by a methacholine bronchial provocation test, were enrolled from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA) adult asthma cohort. The intensity of AHR was assessed by the concentration of methacholine needed to cause a 20{\%} decrease in FEV1 (PC20). Patients were classified into four categories based on body mass index (BMI): underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Results: BMI was negatively correlated with FEV1 (l), FVC (l), and FEV1/FVC ({\%}) in lung function tests. The prevalence of wheezing increased with higher BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, medication history, and PC20 (p < 0.0001). logPC20 was lower in the normal weight group compared with the overweight group (p = 0.003). The risk of moderate or severe AHR (PC 20 ≤ 4 mg/ml) decreased with increased BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and medication history (p = 0.035). Conclusions: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but obesity in asthmatic patients is negatively correlated with the intensity of AHR and is not related to asthma severity. Obesity is positively related with the prevalence of wheezing but negatively related to AHR in asthmatic patients.",
author = "Kwon, {Jae Woo} and Kim, {Sae Hoon} and Kim, {Tae Bum} and Kim, {Sang Heon} and Park, {Heung Woo} and Chang, {Yoon Seok} and Jang, {An Soo} and Cho, {You Sook} and Nahm, {Dong Ho} and Jungwon Park and Yoon, {Ho Joo} and Cho, {Young Joo} and Choi, {Byoung Whui} and Moon, {Hee Bom} and Cho, {Sang Heon}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000335926",
language = "English",
volume = "159",
pages = "187--193",
journal = "International Archives of Allergy and Immunology",
issn = "1018-2438",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "2",

}

Kwon, JW, Kim, SH, Kim, TB, Kim, SH, Park, HW, Chang, YS, Jang, AS, Cho, YS, Nahm, DH, Park, J, Yoon, HJ, Cho, YJ, Choi, BW, Moon, HB & Cho, SH 2012, 'Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma', International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 159, no. 2, pp. 187-193. https://doi.org/10.1159/000335926

Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma. / Kwon, Jae Woo; Kim, Sae Hoon; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Sang Heon; Park, Heung Woo; Chang, Yoon Seok; Jang, An Soo; Cho, You Sook; Nahm, Dong Ho; Park, Jungwon; Yoon, Ho Joo; Cho, Young Joo; Choi, Byoung Whui; Moon, Hee Bom; Cho, Sang Heon.

In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 159, No. 2, 01.09.2012, p. 187-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Airway hyperresponsiveness is negatively associated with obesity or overweight status in patients with asthma

AU - Kwon, Jae Woo

AU - Kim, Sae Hoon

AU - Kim, Tae Bum

AU - Kim, Sang Heon

AU - Park, Heung Woo

AU - Chang, Yoon Seok

AU - Jang, An Soo

AU - Cho, You Sook

AU - Nahm, Dong Ho

AU - Park, Jungwon

AU - Yoon, Ho Joo

AU - Cho, Young Joo

AU - Choi, Byoung Whui

AU - Moon, Hee Bom

AU - Cho, Sang Heon

PY - 2012/9/1

Y1 - 2012/9/1

N2 - Background: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but the effect of obesity on airway hyperresponsiveness (AFHR) or airway inflammation in asthma is not clear. This study evaluated the relationship between obesity and asthma, assessing aspects of symptoms, AHR, and severity. Methods: In total, 852 patients with asthma diagnosed by asthma specialists based on AHR as confirmed by a methacholine bronchial provocation test, were enrolled from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA) adult asthma cohort. The intensity of AHR was assessed by the concentration of methacholine needed to cause a 20% decrease in FEV1 (PC20). Patients were classified into four categories based on body mass index (BMI): underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Results: BMI was negatively correlated with FEV1 (l), FVC (l), and FEV1/FVC (%) in lung function tests. The prevalence of wheezing increased with higher BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, medication history, and PC20 (p < 0.0001). logPC20 was lower in the normal weight group compared with the overweight group (p = 0.003). The risk of moderate or severe AHR (PC 20 ≤ 4 mg/ml) decreased with increased BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and medication history (p = 0.035). Conclusions: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but obesity in asthmatic patients is negatively correlated with the intensity of AHR and is not related to asthma severity. Obesity is positively related with the prevalence of wheezing but negatively related to AHR in asthmatic patients.

AB - Background: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but the effect of obesity on airway hyperresponsiveness (AFHR) or airway inflammation in asthma is not clear. This study evaluated the relationship between obesity and asthma, assessing aspects of symptoms, AHR, and severity. Methods: In total, 852 patients with asthma diagnosed by asthma specialists based on AHR as confirmed by a methacholine bronchial provocation test, were enrolled from the Cohort for Reality and Evolution of Adult Asthma in Korea (COREA) adult asthma cohort. The intensity of AHR was assessed by the concentration of methacholine needed to cause a 20% decrease in FEV1 (PC20). Patients were classified into four categories based on body mass index (BMI): underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Results: BMI was negatively correlated with FEV1 (l), FVC (l), and FEV1/FVC (%) in lung function tests. The prevalence of wheezing increased with higher BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, medication history, and PC20 (p < 0.0001). logPC20 was lower in the normal weight group compared with the overweight group (p = 0.003). The risk of moderate or severe AHR (PC 20 ≤ 4 mg/ml) decreased with increased BMI after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and medication history (p = 0.035). Conclusions: Obesity is a risk factor for asthma in the general population, but obesity in asthmatic patients is negatively correlated with the intensity of AHR and is not related to asthma severity. Obesity is positively related with the prevalence of wheezing but negatively related to AHR in asthmatic patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861833332&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861833332&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000335926

DO - 10.1159/000335926

M3 - Article

C2 - 22678356

AN - SCOPUS:84861833332

VL - 159

SP - 187

EP - 193

JO - International Archives of Allergy and Immunology

JF - International Archives of Allergy and Immunology

SN - 1018-2438

IS - 2

ER -