An average velocity-based routing protocol with low end-to-end delay for wireless sensor networks

Sung Chan Choi, Seong Lyong Gong, Jang Won Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To reduce energy consumption, in most MAC protocols for wireless sensor networks, listen-sleep cycles are adopted. However, even though it is a good solution for energy efficiency, it may introduce a large end-to-end delay due to sleep delay, since a node with a packet to transmit should wait until the next-hop node of the packet awakes. To resolve this issue, in this paper, we propose the Average Velocity-Based Routing (AVR) protocol for wireless sensor networks that aims at reducing the end-toend delay. The AVR protocol is a kind of a geographic routing protocol that considers both location of a node and waiting time of a packet at the MAC layer. When a node can use information of n-hop away neighbor nodes, it calculates the n-hop average velocity for each of its one-hop neighbor nodes and forwards a packet to the neighbor node that has the highest n-hop average velocity. Simulation results show that as the knowledge range, n, increases, the average end-to-end delay decreases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-623
Number of pages3
JournalIEEE Communications Letters
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Sep 8

Fingerprint

End-to-end Delay
Routing Protocol
Routing protocols
Wireless Sensor Networks
Wireless sensor networks
Vertex of a graph
Sleep
Information use
Energy efficiency
Energy utilization
MAC Protocol
Network protocols
Energy Efficiency
Waiting Time
Energy Consumption
Resolve
Cycle
Calculate
Decrease
Range of data

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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An average velocity-based routing protocol with low end-to-end delay for wireless sensor networks. / Choi, Sung Chan; Gong, Seong Lyong; Lee, Jang Won.

In: IEEE Communications Letters, Vol. 13, No. 8, 08.09.2009, p. 621-623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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