An objective pronator drift test application (iPronator) using handheld device

Soojeong Shin, Eunjeong Park, Dong Hyun Lee, Ki Jeong Lee, Jihoe Heo, Hyo Suk Nam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The pronator drift test is widely used to detect mild arm weakness. We developed an application that runs on a handheld device to objectify the pronator drift test and investigated its feasibility in stroke patients. Methods: The iPronator application, which uses the built-in accelerometer in handheld devices, was developed. We enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 10) with mild arm weakness and healthy controls (n = 10) to validate the iPronator. In addition to conventional neurological examinations, the degree of average, maximum, and oscillation in drift and pronation were measured and compared using the iPronator. Follow-up tests using the iPronator were also conducted in the patient group one week later. Results: There was a strong correlation between the average degree of pronation and drift measured by the iPronator (r = 0.741, p<0.001). The degrees of average and maximum in pronation were greater in the patient group than in the control group [in average, 28.9°, interquartile range (IQR) 18.7-40.3 vs. 3.8° (IQR 0.3-7.5), p<0.001], in maximum, 33.0° (IQR 24.0-52.1) vs. 6.2° (IQR 1.4-9.4), p<0.001]. The degree of oscillation in pronation was not different between the groups (p = 0.166). In drift, the degrees of average, maximum, and oscillation were greater in the patient group. In stroke patients, a follow-up study at one week revealed improvements in the degrees of pronation and drift compared with baseline parameters. Conclusions: The iPronator can reliably detect mild arm weakness of stroke patients and was also useful in detecting functional recovery for one week in patients with acute stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere41544
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jul 24

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portable equipment
Pronation
Equipment and Supplies
stroke
Accelerometers
Stroke
testing
oscillation
Recovery
Neurologic Examination
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Shin, Soojeong ; Park, Eunjeong ; Lee, Dong Hyun ; Lee, Ki Jeong ; Heo, Jihoe ; Nam, Hyo Suk. / An objective pronator drift test application (iPronator) using handheld device. In: PloS one. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 7.
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abstract = "Background: The pronator drift test is widely used to detect mild arm weakness. We developed an application that runs on a handheld device to objectify the pronator drift test and investigated its feasibility in stroke patients. Methods: The iPronator application, which uses the built-in accelerometer in handheld devices, was developed. We enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 10) with mild arm weakness and healthy controls (n = 10) to validate the iPronator. In addition to conventional neurological examinations, the degree of average, maximum, and oscillation in drift and pronation were measured and compared using the iPronator. Follow-up tests using the iPronator were also conducted in the patient group one week later. Results: There was a strong correlation between the average degree of pronation and drift measured by the iPronator (r = 0.741, p<0.001). The degrees of average and maximum in pronation were greater in the patient group than in the control group [in average, 28.9°, interquartile range (IQR) 18.7-40.3 vs. 3.8° (IQR 0.3-7.5), p<0.001], in maximum, 33.0° (IQR 24.0-52.1) vs. 6.2° (IQR 1.4-9.4), p<0.001]. The degree of oscillation in pronation was not different between the groups (p = 0.166). In drift, the degrees of average, maximum, and oscillation were greater in the patient group. In stroke patients, a follow-up study at one week revealed improvements in the degrees of pronation and drift compared with baseline parameters. Conclusions: The iPronator can reliably detect mild arm weakness of stroke patients and was also useful in detecting functional recovery for one week in patients with acute stroke.",
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An objective pronator drift test application (iPronator) using handheld device. / Shin, Soojeong; Park, Eunjeong; Lee, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ki Jeong; Heo, Jihoe; Nam, Hyo Suk.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 7, e41544, 24.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - An objective pronator drift test application (iPronator) using handheld device

AU - Shin, Soojeong

AU - Park, Eunjeong

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AU - Nam, Hyo Suk

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AB - Background: The pronator drift test is widely used to detect mild arm weakness. We developed an application that runs on a handheld device to objectify the pronator drift test and investigated its feasibility in stroke patients. Methods: The iPronator application, which uses the built-in accelerometer in handheld devices, was developed. We enrolled acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 10) with mild arm weakness and healthy controls (n = 10) to validate the iPronator. In addition to conventional neurological examinations, the degree of average, maximum, and oscillation in drift and pronation were measured and compared using the iPronator. Follow-up tests using the iPronator were also conducted in the patient group one week later. Results: There was a strong correlation between the average degree of pronation and drift measured by the iPronator (r = 0.741, p<0.001). The degrees of average and maximum in pronation were greater in the patient group than in the control group [in average, 28.9°, interquartile range (IQR) 18.7-40.3 vs. 3.8° (IQR 0.3-7.5), p<0.001], in maximum, 33.0° (IQR 24.0-52.1) vs. 6.2° (IQR 1.4-9.4), p<0.001]. The degree of oscillation in pronation was not different between the groups (p = 0.166). In drift, the degrees of average, maximum, and oscillation were greater in the patient group. In stroke patients, a follow-up study at one week revealed improvements in the degrees of pronation and drift compared with baseline parameters. Conclusions: The iPronator can reliably detect mild arm weakness of stroke patients and was also useful in detecting functional recovery for one week in patients with acute stroke.

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