Analysis of tooth formation by reaggregated dental mesenchyme from mouse embryo

Hitoshi Yamamoto, Eun Jung Kim, Sung Won Cho, Hansung Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tooth morphogenesis is a well-known developmental system related to epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. In mice, the dental epithelium has the potential to induce tooth formation prior to the bud stage, whereas this potential shifts to the dental mesenchyme from the dental epithelium. The reaggregation of mesenchymal tissue leads to previous memories of individual cells being reset, which is useful for studying the predetermination of mesenchyme. Here, the mesenchyme was triturated into single cells after separation of the epithelium and the mesenchyme. These single cells were repelleted and combined with the epithelium. The reaggregated tooth was transplanted into a mice kidney capsule. In order to investigate the essential functions of both the dental epithelium and the dental mesenchyme regarding their mutual interaction, a reaggregation system was introduced using the late bud stage of the mouse first molar. Amelogenin expression was examined to confirm the cytodifferentiation in the reaggregated tooth. The results showed that a new tooth formed after reaggregating the dental mesenchyme. This tooth contained enamel, dentin, dentinal tubules and dental pulp. The inner enamel epithelium of the reaggregated tooth differentiated into ameloblasts. Immunohistochemistry for amelogenin was observed both in the ameloblasts and the enamel. However, the structure of the enamel was different from that of the normal tooth, with the thickness of the predentin becoming wider. These findings suggest that reaggregated dental mesenchyme cells can produce a tooth. The fate of dental epithelium was not affected by reaggregated dental mesenchyme, although the dental mesenchyme appears to lose the information from the dental epithelium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-566
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Electron Microscopy
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Enamels
embryos
Mesoderm
teeth
epithelium
mice
Tooth
Embryonic Structures
enamels
Tooth enamel
Epithelium
Pulp
Tissue
cells
Data storage equipment
Dental Enamel
Amelogenin
Ameloblasts
kidneys
capsules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Yamamoto, Hitoshi ; Kim, Eun Jung ; Cho, Sung Won ; Jung, Hansung. / Analysis of tooth formation by reaggregated dental mesenchyme from mouse embryo. In: Journal of Electron Microscopy. 2003 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 559-566.
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Analysis of tooth formation by reaggregated dental mesenchyme from mouse embryo. / Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kim, Eun Jung; Cho, Sung Won; Jung, Hansung.

In: Journal of Electron Microscopy, Vol. 52, No. 6, 01.12.2003, p. 559-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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