Angiogenesis inhibitor therapies for advanced renal cell carcinoma: Toxicity and treatment patterns in clinical practice from a global medical chart review

William K. Oh, David Mcdermott, Camillo Porta, Antonin Levy, Reza Elaidi, Florian Scotte, Robert Hawkins, Daniel Castellano, Joaquim Bellmunt, Sun Young Rha, Jong Mu Sun, Paul Nathan, Bruce A. Feinberg, Jeffrey Scott, Ray Mcdermott, Jin Hee Ahn, John Wagstaff, Yen Hwa Chang, Yen Chuan Ou, Paul DonnellanChao Yuan Huang, John Mccaffrey, Po Hui Chiang, Cheng Keng Chuang, Caroline Korves, Maureen P. Neary, Jose R. Diaz, Faisal Mehmud, Mei Sheng Duh

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29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the treatment patterns and safety of sunitinib, sorafenib and bevacizumab in real-world clinical settings in US, Europe and Asia. Medical records were abstracted at 18 community oncology clinics in the US and at 21 tertiary oncology centers in US, Europe and Asia for 883 patients ≥18 years who had histologically/cytologically confirmed diagnosis of advanced RCC and received sunitinib (n=631), sorafenib (n=207) or bevacizumab (n=45) as first-line treatment. No prior treatment was permitted. Data were collected on all adverse events (AEs) and treatment modifications, including discontinuation, interruption and dose reduction. Treatment duration was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Demographics were similar across treatment groups and regions. Median treatment duration ranged from 6.1 to 10.7 months, 5.1 to 8.5 months and 7.5 to 9.8 months for sunitinib, sorafenib and bevacizumab patients, respectively. Grade 3/4 AEs were experienced by 26.0, 28.0 and 15.6% of sunitinib, sorafenib and bevacizumab patients, respectively. Treatment discontinuations occurred in 62.4 (Asia) to 63.1% (US) sunitinib, 68.8 (Asia) to 90.0% (Europe) sorafenib, and 66.7 (Asia) to 81.8% (US) bevacizumab patients. Globally, treatment modifications due to AEs occurred in 55.1, 54.2 and 50.0% sunitinib, sorafenib and bevacizumab patients, respectively. This study in a large, global cohort of advanced RCC patients found that angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with high rates of AEs and treatment modifications. Findings suggest an unmet need for more tolerable agents for RCC treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-16
Number of pages12
JournalInternational journal of oncology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Oh, W. K., Mcdermott, D., Porta, C., Levy, A., Elaidi, R., Scotte, F., Hawkins, R., Castellano, D., Bellmunt, J., Rha, S. Y., Sun, J. M., Nathan, P., Feinberg, B. A., Scott, J., Mcdermott, R., Ahn, J. H., Wagstaff, J., Chang, Y. H., Ou, Y. C., ... Duh, M. S. (2014). Angiogenesis inhibitor therapies for advanced renal cell carcinoma: Toxicity and treatment patterns in clinical practice from a global medical chart review. International journal of oncology, 44(1), 5-16. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2013.2181