Anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage

Young Ah Park, Jae Sun Uhm, huinam pak, Moon Hyoung Lee, Boyoung Joung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effect of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with a history of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is poorly defined. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of OAT in patients with AF with an ICH history. Methods: We retrospectively compared the composite end point, including thromboembolic and major bleeding events, between patients with AF with a history of ICH who were (OAT group, n = 254) and those who were not (no-OAT group, n = 174) taking OAT. Results: During a mean follow-up of 39.5 ± 31.9 months, 5.5 and 3.1 major bleeding events/100 patient-years were observed in the OAT and no-OAT groups, respectively (P =.024). Recurrent ICH was observed only in patient with OAT. Thromboembolic events occurred in 2.4 and 8.3 events/100 patient-years in OAT and no-OAT groups, respectively (P <.001). There was no significant differences in composite end points between OAT and no-OAT groups (11.5 events/100 patient-years vs 7.9 events/100 patient-years; P =.154). Patients with OAT who achieved a time-in-therapeutic range of ≥60% of the international normalized ratio of 2.0–3.0 demonstrated a better cumulative survival free of the composite end point (P <.001) than did patients without OAT. Early (<2 weeks) OAT after an index ICH did not improve composite end points because of the increased incidence of major bleeding events. However, OAT at 2 weeks after an index ICH was associated with decreased clinical events including thromboembolic events and composite end point. Conclusion: In patients with AF who require anticoagulation and have a history of ICH, maintaining optimal OAT with time-in-therapeutic range ≥ 60% and the initiation of OAT at least 2 weeks after an index ICH were associated with improved clinical outcomes

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1794-1802
Number of pages9
JournalHeart Rhythm
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

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Intracranial Hemorrhages
Atrial Fibrillation
Group Psychotherapy
Therapeutics
Hemorrhage
International Normalized Ratio

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Park, Young Ah ; Uhm, Jae Sun ; pak, huinam ; Lee, Moon Hyoung ; Joung, Boyoung. / Anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage. In: Heart Rhythm. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 1794-1802.
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title = "Anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage",
abstract = "Background: The effect of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with a history of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is poorly defined. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of OAT in patients with AF with an ICH history. Methods: We retrospectively compared the composite end point, including thromboembolic and major bleeding events, between patients with AF with a history of ICH who were (OAT group, n = 254) and those who were not (no-OAT group, n = 174) taking OAT. Results: During a mean follow-up of 39.5 ± 31.9 months, 5.5 and 3.1 major bleeding events/100 patient-years were observed in the OAT and no-OAT groups, respectively (P =.024). Recurrent ICH was observed only in patient with OAT. Thromboembolic events occurred in 2.4 and 8.3 events/100 patient-years in OAT and no-OAT groups, respectively (P <.001). There was no significant differences in composite end points between OAT and no-OAT groups (11.5 events/100 patient-years vs 7.9 events/100 patient-years; P =.154). Patients with OAT who achieved a time-in-therapeutic range of ≥60{\%} of the international normalized ratio of 2.0–3.0 demonstrated a better cumulative survival free of the composite end point (P <.001) than did patients without OAT. Early (<2 weeks) OAT after an index ICH did not improve composite end points because of the increased incidence of major bleeding events. However, OAT at 2 weeks after an index ICH was associated with decreased clinical events including thromboembolic events and composite end point. Conclusion: In patients with AF who require anticoagulation and have a history of ICH, maintaining optimal OAT with time-in-therapeutic range ≥ 60{\%} and the initiation of OAT at least 2 weeks after an index ICH were associated with improved clinical outcomes",
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Anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage. / Park, Young Ah; Uhm, Jae Sun; pak, huinam; Lee, Moon Hyoung; Joung, Boyoung.

In: Heart Rhythm, Vol. 13, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 1794-1802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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