Application of two contrasting rice-residue-based biochars triggered gaseous loss of nitrogen under denitrification-favoring conditions: A short-term study based on acetylene inhibition technique

Saadatullah Malghani, Jinhyun Kim, Seung Hoon Lee, Ga young Yoo, Hojeong Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Denitrification is the key microbial process that leads to gaseous loss of soil nitrogen in agricultural lands. Most alarmingly, the dominant gas species could be N2O, which is a much stronger greenhouse gas than CO2. In addition to the primary role as tool for soil carbon sequestration, biochar has the potential to suppress N2O emissions. However, the mechanism for the suppression of N2O emissions by biochar remains elusive. To address this, we performed a short-term incubation experiment targeting the impact of two contrasting biochars on gaseous loss of soil N under denitrification-favoring conditions including high load of NO3 (100 µg N/g soil), anoxia and high moisture content (70% WFPS). The acetylene inhibition technique was adopted to differentiate N losses as N2 and N2O. Two biochars produced from rice chaff (600 °C, pH > 10, C:N 70) or rice husk (300 °C, pH < 5, C:N 54) were applied at two rates (5 and 10% w/w). Results exhibited an increase in gaseous loss of N in all biochar treatments compared with an unamended control. The presence of a positive correlation between total denitrification and CO2 emission rates suggested that biochar derived labile carbon played a pivotal role in triggering the loss of N in gaseous forms. Similarly, the abundances of denitrifying genes nosZ and nirS were considerably higher in biochar treatments, indicating denitrifier's heterotrophic nature. The biochar pyrolysis conditions and application rates played a decisive role in controlling N2O emissions. Rice chaff biochar, primarily characterized by its alkaline pH, significantly suppressed N2O emissions. Taken together, biochar amendment to agricultural soil can trigger N losses via denitrification and only the alkaline biochar suppressed N2O emissions, probably because of the enhanced activity of N2O reductase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-119
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Soil Ecology
Volume127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Denitrification
biochar
Acetylene
acetylene
denitrification
Nitrogen
rice
nitrous oxide
nitrogen
Soil
chaff
methodology
anoxia
soil nitrogen
carbon dioxide
soil carbon
agricultural soil
carbon sequestration
pyrolysis
targeting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Soil Science

Cite this

@article{9658526f366a4313b0279c89bca7f3db,
title = "Application of two contrasting rice-residue-based biochars triggered gaseous loss of nitrogen under denitrification-favoring conditions: A short-term study based on acetylene inhibition technique",
abstract = "Denitrification is the key microbial process that leads to gaseous loss of soil nitrogen in agricultural lands. Most alarmingly, the dominant gas species could be N2O, which is a much stronger greenhouse gas than CO2. In addition to the primary role as tool for soil carbon sequestration, biochar has the potential to suppress N2O emissions. However, the mechanism for the suppression of N2O emissions by biochar remains elusive. To address this, we performed a short-term incubation experiment targeting the impact of two contrasting biochars on gaseous loss of soil N under denitrification-favoring conditions including high load of NO3 − (100 µg N/g soil), anoxia and high moisture content (70{\%} WFPS). The acetylene inhibition technique was adopted to differentiate N losses as N2 and N2O. Two biochars produced from rice chaff (600 °C, pH > 10, C:N 70) or rice husk (300 °C, pH < 5, C:N 54) were applied at two rates (5 and 10{\%} w/w). Results exhibited an increase in gaseous loss of N in all biochar treatments compared with an unamended control. The presence of a positive correlation between total denitrification and CO2 emission rates suggested that biochar derived labile carbon played a pivotal role in triggering the loss of N in gaseous forms. Similarly, the abundances of denitrifying genes nosZ and nirS were considerably higher in biochar treatments, indicating denitrifier's heterotrophic nature. The biochar pyrolysis conditions and application rates played a decisive role in controlling N2O emissions. Rice chaff biochar, primarily characterized by its alkaline pH, significantly suppressed N2O emissions. Taken together, biochar amendment to agricultural soil can trigger N losses via denitrification and only the alkaline biochar suppressed N2O emissions, probably because of the enhanced activity of N2O reductase.",
author = "Saadatullah Malghani and Jinhyun Kim and Lee, {Seung Hoon} and Yoo, {Ga young} and Hojeong Kang",
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Application of two contrasting rice-residue-based biochars triggered gaseous loss of nitrogen under denitrification-favoring conditions : A short-term study based on acetylene inhibition technique. / Malghani, Saadatullah; Kim, Jinhyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Yoo, Ga young; Kang, Hojeong.

In: Applied Soil Ecology, Vol. 127, 01.06.2018, p. 112-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of two contrasting rice-residue-based biochars triggered gaseous loss of nitrogen under denitrification-favoring conditions

T2 - A short-term study based on acetylene inhibition technique

AU - Malghani, Saadatullah

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AU - Kang, Hojeong

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N2 - Denitrification is the key microbial process that leads to gaseous loss of soil nitrogen in agricultural lands. Most alarmingly, the dominant gas species could be N2O, which is a much stronger greenhouse gas than CO2. In addition to the primary role as tool for soil carbon sequestration, biochar has the potential to suppress N2O emissions. However, the mechanism for the suppression of N2O emissions by biochar remains elusive. To address this, we performed a short-term incubation experiment targeting the impact of two contrasting biochars on gaseous loss of soil N under denitrification-favoring conditions including high load of NO3 − (100 µg N/g soil), anoxia and high moisture content (70% WFPS). The acetylene inhibition technique was adopted to differentiate N losses as N2 and N2O. Two biochars produced from rice chaff (600 °C, pH > 10, C:N 70) or rice husk (300 °C, pH < 5, C:N 54) were applied at two rates (5 and 10% w/w). Results exhibited an increase in gaseous loss of N in all biochar treatments compared with an unamended control. The presence of a positive correlation between total denitrification and CO2 emission rates suggested that biochar derived labile carbon played a pivotal role in triggering the loss of N in gaseous forms. Similarly, the abundances of denitrifying genes nosZ and nirS were considerably higher in biochar treatments, indicating denitrifier's heterotrophic nature. The biochar pyrolysis conditions and application rates played a decisive role in controlling N2O emissions. Rice chaff biochar, primarily characterized by its alkaline pH, significantly suppressed N2O emissions. Taken together, biochar amendment to agricultural soil can trigger N losses via denitrification and only the alkaline biochar suppressed N2O emissions, probably because of the enhanced activity of N2O reductase.

AB - Denitrification is the key microbial process that leads to gaseous loss of soil nitrogen in agricultural lands. Most alarmingly, the dominant gas species could be N2O, which is a much stronger greenhouse gas than CO2. In addition to the primary role as tool for soil carbon sequestration, biochar has the potential to suppress N2O emissions. However, the mechanism for the suppression of N2O emissions by biochar remains elusive. To address this, we performed a short-term incubation experiment targeting the impact of two contrasting biochars on gaseous loss of soil N under denitrification-favoring conditions including high load of NO3 − (100 µg N/g soil), anoxia and high moisture content (70% WFPS). The acetylene inhibition technique was adopted to differentiate N losses as N2 and N2O. Two biochars produced from rice chaff (600 °C, pH > 10, C:N 70) or rice husk (300 °C, pH < 5, C:N 54) were applied at two rates (5 and 10% w/w). Results exhibited an increase in gaseous loss of N in all biochar treatments compared with an unamended control. The presence of a positive correlation between total denitrification and CO2 emission rates suggested that biochar derived labile carbon played a pivotal role in triggering the loss of N in gaseous forms. Similarly, the abundances of denitrifying genes nosZ and nirS were considerably higher in biochar treatments, indicating denitrifier's heterotrophic nature. The biochar pyrolysis conditions and application rates played a decisive role in controlling N2O emissions. Rice chaff biochar, primarily characterized by its alkaline pH, significantly suppressed N2O emissions. Taken together, biochar amendment to agricultural soil can trigger N losses via denitrification and only the alkaline biochar suppressed N2O emissions, probably because of the enhanced activity of N2O reductase.

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