Are neighbourhoods self-stabilising? Exploring endogenous dynamics

George Galster, Jackie Cutsinger, Up Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates how neighbourhoods respond when they are upset by transient, exogenous shock(s). Do they quickly revert to their original, stable state, gradually return to this stable state, permanently settle into another stable state, diverge progressively from any steady state, or evince no discernable pattern of response? A self-regulating adjustment process promoting stability appears the norm, based on econometric investigations of multiple, annually measured indicators from census tracts in five US cities. Stability quickly re-established at the original state characterises most of the indicators analysed: rates of tax delinquency, low-weight births, teenage births and home sales volumes. Violent and property crime rates also evince endogenous stability at the original state, but take considerably longer than the other indicators to return to it when the exogenous shock is sizeable. Moreover, this crime adjustment process is considerably slower in neighbourhoods with higher poverty rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-185
Number of pages19
JournalUrban Studies
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan 1

Fingerprint

crime
crime rate
delinquency
econometrics
taxes
sales
census
poverty
offense
indicator
rate
norm
city
tax

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Galster, George ; Cutsinger, Jackie ; Lim, Up. / Are neighbourhoods self-stabilising? Exploring endogenous dynamics. In: Urban Studies. 2007 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 167-185.
@article{6cc1b93418b54cf180fe949116d92255,
title = "Are neighbourhoods self-stabilising? Exploring endogenous dynamics",
abstract = "This study investigates how neighbourhoods respond when they are upset by transient, exogenous shock(s). Do they quickly revert to their original, stable state, gradually return to this stable state, permanently settle into another stable state, diverge progressively from any steady state, or evince no discernable pattern of response? A self-regulating adjustment process promoting stability appears the norm, based on econometric investigations of multiple, annually measured indicators from census tracts in five US cities. Stability quickly re-established at the original state characterises most of the indicators analysed: rates of tax delinquency, low-weight births, teenage births and home sales volumes. Violent and property crime rates also evince endogenous stability at the original state, but take considerably longer than the other indicators to return to it when the exogenous shock is sizeable. Moreover, this crime adjustment process is considerably slower in neighbourhoods with higher poverty rates.",
author = "George Galster and Jackie Cutsinger and Up Lim",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00420980601023851",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "167--185",
journal = "Urban Studies",
issn = "0042-0980",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Are neighbourhoods self-stabilising? Exploring endogenous dynamics. / Galster, George; Cutsinger, Jackie; Lim, Up.

In: Urban Studies, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 167-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are neighbourhoods self-stabilising? Exploring endogenous dynamics

AU - Galster, George

AU - Cutsinger, Jackie

AU - Lim, Up

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - This study investigates how neighbourhoods respond when they are upset by transient, exogenous shock(s). Do they quickly revert to their original, stable state, gradually return to this stable state, permanently settle into another stable state, diverge progressively from any steady state, or evince no discernable pattern of response? A self-regulating adjustment process promoting stability appears the norm, based on econometric investigations of multiple, annually measured indicators from census tracts in five US cities. Stability quickly re-established at the original state characterises most of the indicators analysed: rates of tax delinquency, low-weight births, teenage births and home sales volumes. Violent and property crime rates also evince endogenous stability at the original state, but take considerably longer than the other indicators to return to it when the exogenous shock is sizeable. Moreover, this crime adjustment process is considerably slower in neighbourhoods with higher poverty rates.

AB - This study investigates how neighbourhoods respond when they are upset by transient, exogenous shock(s). Do they quickly revert to their original, stable state, gradually return to this stable state, permanently settle into another stable state, diverge progressively from any steady state, or evince no discernable pattern of response? A self-regulating adjustment process promoting stability appears the norm, based on econometric investigations of multiple, annually measured indicators from census tracts in five US cities. Stability quickly re-established at the original state characterises most of the indicators analysed: rates of tax delinquency, low-weight births, teenage births and home sales volumes. Violent and property crime rates also evince endogenous stability at the original state, but take considerably longer than the other indicators to return to it when the exogenous shock is sizeable. Moreover, this crime adjustment process is considerably slower in neighbourhoods with higher poverty rates.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250754977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34250754977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00420980601023851

DO - 10.1080/00420980601023851

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34250754977

VL - 44

SP - 167

EP - 185

JO - Urban Studies

JF - Urban Studies

SN - 0042-0980

IS - 1

ER -