Are personality disorders associated with social welfare burden in the United States?

Michael G. Vaughn, Quana Fu, Devin Beaver, Matt DeLisi, Brian Perron, Matthew Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between personality disorders and use of major social welfare services in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (N = 43,093). Social welfare services received and diagnoses of personality, substance use, mood, and anxiety disorders were assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV- version. Analyses quantified the association between personality disorders and forms of public assistance while controlling for numerous confounds. Logistic regression analyses revealed dependent personality disorder, paranoid personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and avoidant personality disorder were significantly associated with increased odds of receiving public assistance. In contrast, persons diagnosed with histrionic, schizoid, and obsessive-personality disorder were not significantly more likely to receive any public welfare service. Development of effective prevention and treatment of personality disorders would likely lead to reductions in overall social welfare burden.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709-720
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Personality Disorders
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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