Aromatase Inhibitors and Newly Developed Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Postmenopausal Patients with Early Breast Cancer: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study

Jung Il Lee, Jung Hwan Yu, Sung Gwe Anh, Hyun Woong Lee, Joon Jeong, Kwan Sik Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Unlike tamoxifen, the relationship between aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not been delineated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 253 patients with early breast cancer without baseline NAFLD and treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors was performed. Among them, 220 patients were matched for sex, age, and menstruation status with healthy patients, and the prevalence of NAFLD was compared. NAFLD was determined by hepatic steatosis index in the absence of other known liver diseases. The presence of significant liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD was determined noninvasively by AST-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 score, and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). Results: Postmenopausal patients with breast cancer undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors had higher prevalence of NAFLD independent of body mass index (BMI) and underlying diabetes mellitus (DM). Although the aromatase inhibitor group showed higher fibrotic burden by NFS, independent of BMI and DM, the proportion of advanced fibrosis did not show statistically significant differences between AI-treated patients and the healthy patients. Those with abnormal baseline fasting glucose levels are suggested to have increased risk of NAFLD development after aromatase inhibitor treatment. In addition, patients with NAFLD developed after aromatase inhibitor use had significantly lower disease-free survival than those without NAFLD, although there was no significant difference in overall survival. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Implications for Practice: Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity-matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compared with healthy women after menopause, independent of obesity and diabetes mellitus. The results show possible adverse influence of the newly developed fatty liver on breast cancer disease-free survival and suggest a necessity for further validation. Fatty liver may need to be considered as an adverse event for aromatase inhibitor treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e653-e661
JournalOncologist
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Propensity Score
Aromatase Inhibitors
Cohort Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Fatty Liver
Diabetes Mellitus
Tamoxifen
Liver Cirrhosis
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Disease-Free Survival
Body Mass Index
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Breast Diseases
Menstruation
Menopause
Liver Diseases
Fasting
Estrogens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

@article{e527b1fca2b644d4980b8d3657404558,
title = "Aromatase Inhibitors and Newly Developed Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Postmenopausal Patients with Early Breast Cancer: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study",
abstract = "Background: Unlike tamoxifen, the relationship between aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not been delineated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 253 patients with early breast cancer without baseline NAFLD and treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors was performed. Among them, 220 patients were matched for sex, age, and menstruation status with healthy patients, and the prevalence of NAFLD was compared. NAFLD was determined by hepatic steatosis index in the absence of other known liver diseases. The presence of significant liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD was determined noninvasively by AST-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 score, and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). Results: Postmenopausal patients with breast cancer undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors had higher prevalence of NAFLD independent of body mass index (BMI) and underlying diabetes mellitus (DM). Although the aromatase inhibitor group showed higher fibrotic burden by NFS, independent of BMI and DM, the proportion of advanced fibrosis did not show statistically significant differences between AI-treated patients and the healthy patients. Those with abnormal baseline fasting glucose levels are suggested to have increased risk of NAFLD development after aromatase inhibitor treatment. In addition, patients with NAFLD developed after aromatase inhibitor use had significantly lower disease-free survival than those without NAFLD, although there was no significant difference in overall survival. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Implications for Practice: Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity-matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compared with healthy women after menopause, independent of obesity and diabetes mellitus. The results show possible adverse influence of the newly developed fatty liver on breast cancer disease-free survival and suggest a necessity for further validation. Fatty liver may need to be considered as an adverse event for aromatase inhibitor treatment.",
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Aromatase Inhibitors and Newly Developed Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Postmenopausal Patients with Early Breast Cancer : A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study. / Lee, Jung Il; Yu, Jung Hwan; Anh, Sung Gwe; Lee, Hyun Woong; Jeong, Joon; Lee, Kwan Sik.

In: Oncologist, Vol. 24, No. 8, 01.01.2019, p. e653-e661.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Aromatase Inhibitors and Newly Developed Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Postmenopausal Patients with Early Breast Cancer

T2 - A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study

AU - Lee, Jung Il

AU - Yu, Jung Hwan

AU - Anh, Sung Gwe

AU - Lee, Hyun Woong

AU - Jeong, Joon

AU - Lee, Kwan Sik

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Unlike tamoxifen, the relationship between aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not been delineated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 253 patients with early breast cancer without baseline NAFLD and treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors was performed. Among them, 220 patients were matched for sex, age, and menstruation status with healthy patients, and the prevalence of NAFLD was compared. NAFLD was determined by hepatic steatosis index in the absence of other known liver diseases. The presence of significant liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD was determined noninvasively by AST-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 score, and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). Results: Postmenopausal patients with breast cancer undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors had higher prevalence of NAFLD independent of body mass index (BMI) and underlying diabetes mellitus (DM). Although the aromatase inhibitor group showed higher fibrotic burden by NFS, independent of BMI and DM, the proportion of advanced fibrosis did not show statistically significant differences between AI-treated patients and the healthy patients. Those with abnormal baseline fasting glucose levels are suggested to have increased risk of NAFLD development after aromatase inhibitor treatment. In addition, patients with NAFLD developed after aromatase inhibitor use had significantly lower disease-free survival than those without NAFLD, although there was no significant difference in overall survival. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Implications for Practice: Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity-matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compared with healthy women after menopause, independent of obesity and diabetes mellitus. The results show possible adverse influence of the newly developed fatty liver on breast cancer disease-free survival and suggest a necessity for further validation. Fatty liver may need to be considered as an adverse event for aromatase inhibitor treatment.

AB - Background: Unlike tamoxifen, the relationship between aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not been delineated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 253 patients with early breast cancer without baseline NAFLD and treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors was performed. Among them, 220 patients were matched for sex, age, and menstruation status with healthy patients, and the prevalence of NAFLD was compared. NAFLD was determined by hepatic steatosis index in the absence of other known liver diseases. The presence of significant liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD was determined noninvasively by AST-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 score, and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). Results: Postmenopausal patients with breast cancer undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors had higher prevalence of NAFLD independent of body mass index (BMI) and underlying diabetes mellitus (DM). Although the aromatase inhibitor group showed higher fibrotic burden by NFS, independent of BMI and DM, the proportion of advanced fibrosis did not show statistically significant differences between AI-treated patients and the healthy patients. Those with abnormal baseline fasting glucose levels are suggested to have increased risk of NAFLD development after aromatase inhibitor treatment. In addition, patients with NAFLD developed after aromatase inhibitor use had significantly lower disease-free survival than those without NAFLD, although there was no significant difference in overall survival. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Implications for Practice: Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity-matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compared with healthy women after menopause, independent of obesity and diabetes mellitus. The results show possible adverse influence of the newly developed fatty liver on breast cancer disease-free survival and suggest a necessity for further validation. Fatty liver may need to be considered as an adverse event for aromatase inhibitor treatment.

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