Assessment of regional threats to human water security adopting the global framework: A case study in South Korea

Yeonjoo Kim, Inhye Kong, Hyesun Park, Heey Jin Kim, Ik Jae Kim, Myoung Jin Um, Pamela A. Green, Charles J. Vörösmarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Water resources have been threatened by climate change, increasing population, land cover changes in watersheds, urban expansion, and intensive use of freshwater resources. Thus, it is critical to understand the sustainability and security of water resources. This study aims to understand how we can adequately and efficiently quantify water use sustainability at both regional and global scales with an indicator-based approach. A case study of South Korea was examined with the framework widely used to quantify global human water threats. We estimated the human water threat with both global and local datasets, showing that the water security index using global data was adequately correlated with the index for regional data. However, particularly poor associations were found in the investment benefit factors. Furthermore, we examined several different aspects of the index with the local datasets as they have relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. For example, we used cropland percentage, population and moderate water use as surrogate indicators instead of employing the approximately 20 original indicators, and we presented a regression model that was able to capture the spatial variations from the original threat index to some extent. This finding implies that it would be possible to predict water security or sustainability using existing indicator datasets for future periods, although it would require regionally developed relationships between water security and such indicators.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1413-1422
Number of pages10
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume637-638
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 1

Fingerprint

Water
sustainability
Sustainable development
water use
water
water resource
Water resources
land cover
spatial variation
indicator
Watersheds
watershed
Climate change
climate change
index
freshwater resource

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Kim, Yeonjoo ; Kong, Inhye ; Park, Hyesun ; Kim, Heey Jin ; Kim, Ik Jae ; Um, Myoung Jin ; Green, Pamela A. ; Vörösmarty, Charles J. / Assessment of regional threats to human water security adopting the global framework : A case study in South Korea. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2018 ; Vol. 637-638. pp. 1413-1422.
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Assessment of regional threats to human water security adopting the global framework : A case study in South Korea. / Kim, Yeonjoo; Kong, Inhye; Park, Hyesun; Kim, Heey Jin; Kim, Ik Jae; Um, Myoung Jin; Green, Pamela A.; Vörösmarty, Charles J.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 637-638, 01.10.2018, p. 1413-1422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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