Associating child sexual abuse with child victimization in China

Ko Ling Chan, Elsie Yan, Douglas A. Brownridge, Patrick Ip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To provide a comprehensive profile of the prevalence of child sexual abuse as well as other forms of child victimization in China and to examine the associations between child sexual abuse, demographic factors, and other forms of child victimization. Study design: Using a 2-staged stratified sampling procedure, we recruited a total of 18 341 students in grades 9-12 (girls 46.7%, mean age 15.86 years) from 150 randomly sampled schools during November 2009 through July 2010 in 6 Chinese cities. We assessed the students' demographic background and their experience of child sexual abuse and other forms of victimization. The independent effect on child sexual abuse of each demographic factor and form of child victimization was examined after controlling for other variables. Results: The overall lifetime and preceding-year prevalence of child sexual abuse was 8.0% and 6.4%, respectively. Boys were more likely to report child sexual abuse than were girls. Apart from having experienced other forms of child victimization, several characteristics were associated with greater risk of child sexual abuse: being a boy; being older; having sibling(s); having divorced, separated, or widowed parents; or having an unemployed father. Conclusions: This study provides reliable estimates of child victimization to facilitate resource allocation in health care settings in China. The strong associations between child sexual abuse and other forms of child victimization warrant screening for additional forms of child victimization once any one of them has been identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1028-1034
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume162
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 May 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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