Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters: A nationwide cross-sectional study

Yeong Kwang Kim, Yeon Soon Ahn, Kyoosang Kim, JinHa Yoon, Jaehoon Roh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. Participants: A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Results: Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. Conclusions: High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury, and also with an increased frequency of injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere012002
JournalBMJ open
Volume6
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Firefighters
Occupational Injuries
Cross-Sectional Studies
Workplace
Wounds and Injuries
Reward
Republic of Korea
Emergency Medical Services
Korea
Climate
Conflict (Psychology)
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kim, Yeong Kwang ; Ahn, Yeon Soon ; Kim, Kyoosang ; Yoon, JinHa ; Roh, Jaehoon. / Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters : A nationwide cross-sectional study. In: BMJ open. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 11.
@article{04d69d87a5a642e5bd0ce668256fe862,
title = "Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters: A nationwide cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Objective: We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. Participants: A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6{\%}) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Results: Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95{\%} CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95{\%} CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95{\%} CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95{\%} CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95{\%} CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95{\%} CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95{\%} CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95{\%} CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95{\%} CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95{\%} CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95{\%} CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95{\%} CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95{\%} CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95{\%} CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95{\%} CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95{\%} CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. Conclusions: High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury, and also with an increased frequency of injuries.",
author = "Kim, {Yeong Kwang} and Ahn, {Yeon Soon} and Kyoosang Kim and JinHa Yoon and Jaehoon Roh",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012002",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "BMJ Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters : A nationwide cross-sectional study. / Kim, Yeong Kwang; Ahn, Yeon Soon; Kim, Kyoosang; Yoon, JinHa; Roh, Jaehoon.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 6, No. 11, e012002, 01.11.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between job stress and occupational injuries among Korean firefighters

T2 - A nationwide cross-sectional study

AU - Kim, Yeong Kwang

AU - Ahn, Yeon Soon

AU - Kim, Kyoosang

AU - Yoon, JinHa

AU - Roh, Jaehoon

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Objective: We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. Participants: A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Results: Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. Conclusions: High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury, and also with an increased frequency of injuries.

AB - Objective: We aimed to assess the nature of association between job stress and occupational injuries among firefighters in Korea. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: We conducted a nationwide survey using self-reported questionnaires in South Korea. Participants: A survey was conducted among 30 630 firefighters; 25 616 (83.6%) responded. Our study included firefighters who were 20-59 years old. Individuals with <12 months of current job experience and those with missing data were excluded; ultimately, 14 991 firefighters were analysed. Results: Among fire suppression personnel, high job demands (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.77), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.37), a poor organisational system (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55), and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.64) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; high job demands (OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) were also associated with the frequency of injuries. Among emergency medical services personnel, high job demands (OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), a poor organisational system (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.85), lack of reward (OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.69) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.54) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injury; low job control (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38), high interpersonal conflicts (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.36), lack of reward (OR=1.17, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.35) and a negative workplace climate (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.34) were also associated with a greater number of injuries. Among officers, high job demands (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.85) and a negative workplace environment (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.10) were associated with the occurrence of occupational injuries; however, there was no significant correlation between job stress and the number of injuries. Conclusions: High job stress among firefighters was associated with both the occurrence of occupational injury, and also with an increased frequency of injuries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84998980881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84998980881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012002

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012002

M3 - Article

C2 - 27888173

AN - SCOPUS:84998980881

VL - 6

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 11

M1 - e012002

ER -