Association between the return-to-work hierarchy and self-rated health, self-esteem, and self-efficacy

Inchul Jeong, JinHa Yoon, Jaehoon Roh, Jeongbae Rhie, Jong Uk Won

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to examine whether change of employer and/or job upon return-to-work after work-related injuries and diseases is related to health outcomes; self-rated health, self-esteem, and self-efficacy were used as indicators. Methods: Data from the Panel Study of Workers’ Compensation Insurance in Korea were used. A total of 1,610 workers who had returned to work after work-related injuries and diseases were included. The workers were divided into four groups according to their return-to-work characteristics: same employer, same job (n = 660); same employer, different job (n = 57); different employer, same job (n = 318); and different employer, different job (n = 575). Self-rated health, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Self-Efficacy Scale scores were used as outcome variables. Logistic regression analysis was used. Results: Compared to workers who had returned to the same employer and same job, those who had returned to the same employer but a different job were less likely to report good self-rated health (odds ratio [OR] 0.54; confidence interval [CI] 0.30–0.97). Those returning to a different employer but the same job were less likely to report good self-rated health (0.47, 0.35–0.64) and high self-esteem (0.73, 0.55–0.96). Those returning to a different employer and different job were less likely to report good self-rated health (0.49, 0.38–0.63), high self-esteem (0.68, 0.54–0.86), and high self-efficacy (0.66, 0.52–0.83). Conclusions: Change of employer and/or job related to health outcomes. Returning to the same employer and same job should be set as a goal in the vocational rehabilitation process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)709-716
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul 1

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Return to Work
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Health
Self Report
Vocational Rehabilitation
Workers' Compensation
Wounds and Injuries
Korea
Insurance
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Association between the return-to-work hierarchy and self-rated health, self-esteem, and self-efficacy",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aimed to examine whether change of employer and/or job upon return-to-work after work-related injuries and diseases is related to health outcomes; self-rated health, self-esteem, and self-efficacy were used as indicators. Methods: Data from the Panel Study of Workers’ Compensation Insurance in Korea were used. A total of 1,610 workers who had returned to work after work-related injuries and diseases were included. The workers were divided into four groups according to their return-to-work characteristics: same employer, same job (n = 660); same employer, different job (n = 57); different employer, same job (n = 318); and different employer, different job (n = 575). Self-rated health, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Self-Efficacy Scale scores were used as outcome variables. Logistic regression analysis was used. Results: Compared to workers who had returned to the same employer and same job, those who had returned to the same employer but a different job were less likely to report good self-rated health (odds ratio [OR] 0.54; confidence interval [CI] 0.30–0.97). Those returning to a different employer but the same job were less likely to report good self-rated health (0.47, 0.35–0.64) and high self-esteem (0.73, 0.55–0.96). Those returning to a different employer and different job were less likely to report good self-rated health (0.49, 0.38–0.63), high self-esteem (0.68, 0.54–0.86), and high self-efficacy (0.66, 0.52–0.83). Conclusions: Change of employer and/or job related to health outcomes. Returning to the same employer and same job should be set as a goal in the vocational rehabilitation process.",
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Association between the return-to-work hierarchy and self-rated health, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. / Jeong, Inchul; Yoon, JinHa; Roh, Jaehoon; Rhie, Jeongbae; Won, Jong Uk.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 92, No. 5, 01.07.2019, p. 709-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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