Association of body fat percentage and waist-hip ratio with brain cortical thickness

A study among 1777 cognitively normal subjects

Hee Jin Kim, Changsoo Kim, Seun Jeon, Mira Kang, Yeo Jin Kim, Jong Min Lee, Hee Young Shin, Hanna Cho, Byoung Seok Ye, Jung Hyun Kim, Eun Young Jang, Jaelim Cho, Duk L. Na, Kathryn M. Rexrode, Sang Won Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasing evidence has emerged that there is a link between body weight and the risk of developing dementia. However, the relationship between adiposity and brain structure has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the association of body fat composition with cortical thickness in cognitively normal subjects. Methods: In total, 1777 (887 men and 890 women) cognitively normal subjects, aged 45 years or older, were recruited from the Health Promotion Center in South Korea. Medical records including 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, body fat percentage, waist-hip ratio (WHR), and other factors were reviewed. Results: In men, the percentage of fat was positively associated with cortical thickness and the highest WHR group showed significantly decreased cortical thickness compared with the reference group. WHR showed an inverted U-shaped association with total cortical thickness and frontal lobe thickness in men. Among women, there was no significant association. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in men, body fat is positively associated with cortical thickness, whereas abdominal fat is negatively associated with cortical thickness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-286
Number of pages8
JournalAlzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Waist-Hip Ratio
Adipose Tissue
Brain
Abdominal Fat
Republic of Korea
Adiposity
Frontal Lobe
Body Composition
Health Promotion
Medical Records
Dementia
Fats
Body Weight
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kim, Hee Jin ; Kim, Changsoo ; Jeon, Seun ; Kang, Mira ; Kim, Yeo Jin ; Lee, Jong Min ; Shin, Hee Young ; Cho, Hanna ; Ye, Byoung Seok ; Kim, Jung Hyun ; Young Jang, Eun ; Cho, Jaelim ; Na, Duk L. ; Rexrode, Kathryn M. ; Seo, Sang Won. / Association of body fat percentage and waist-hip ratio with brain cortical thickness : A study among 1777 cognitively normal subjects. In: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 279-286.
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Kim, HJ, Kim, C, Jeon, S, Kang, M, Kim, YJ, Lee, JM, Shin, HY, Cho, H, Ye, BS, Kim, JH, Young Jang, E, Cho, J, Na, DL, Rexrode, KM & Seo, SW 2015, 'Association of body fat percentage and waist-hip ratio with brain cortical thickness: A study among 1777 cognitively normal subjects', Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 279-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/WAD.0000000000000079

Association of body fat percentage and waist-hip ratio with brain cortical thickness : A study among 1777 cognitively normal subjects. / Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Changsoo; Jeon, Seun; Kang, Mira; Kim, Yeo Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Shin, Hee Young; Cho, Hanna; Ye, Byoung Seok; Kim, Jung Hyun; Young Jang, Eun; Cho, Jaelim; Na, Duk L.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Seo, Sang Won.

In: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 279-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Association of body fat percentage and waist-hip ratio with brain cortical thickness

T2 - A study among 1777 cognitively normal subjects

AU - Kim, Hee Jin

AU - Kim, Changsoo

AU - Jeon, Seun

AU - Kang, Mira

AU - Kim, Yeo Jin

AU - Lee, Jong Min

AU - Shin, Hee Young

AU - Cho, Hanna

AU - Ye, Byoung Seok

AU - Kim, Jung Hyun

AU - Young Jang, Eun

AU - Cho, Jaelim

AU - Na, Duk L.

AU - Rexrode, Kathryn M.

AU - Seo, Sang Won

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: Increasing evidence has emerged that there is a link between body weight and the risk of developing dementia. However, the relationship between adiposity and brain structure has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the association of body fat composition with cortical thickness in cognitively normal subjects. Methods: In total, 1777 (887 men and 890 women) cognitively normal subjects, aged 45 years or older, were recruited from the Health Promotion Center in South Korea. Medical records including 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, body fat percentage, waist-hip ratio (WHR), and other factors were reviewed. Results: In men, the percentage of fat was positively associated with cortical thickness and the highest WHR group showed significantly decreased cortical thickness compared with the reference group. WHR showed an inverted U-shaped association with total cortical thickness and frontal lobe thickness in men. Among women, there was no significant association. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in men, body fat is positively associated with cortical thickness, whereas abdominal fat is negatively associated with cortical thickness.

AB - Background: Increasing evidence has emerged that there is a link between body weight and the risk of developing dementia. However, the relationship between adiposity and brain structure has not yet been fully elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the association of body fat composition with cortical thickness in cognitively normal subjects. Methods: In total, 1777 (887 men and 890 women) cognitively normal subjects, aged 45 years or older, were recruited from the Health Promotion Center in South Korea. Medical records including 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, body fat percentage, waist-hip ratio (WHR), and other factors were reviewed. Results: In men, the percentage of fat was positively associated with cortical thickness and the highest WHR group showed significantly decreased cortical thickness compared with the reference group. WHR showed an inverted U-shaped association with total cortical thickness and frontal lobe thickness in men. Among women, there was no significant association. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in men, body fat is positively associated with cortical thickness, whereas abdominal fat is negatively associated with cortical thickness.

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