Associations between time in bed and suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts in Korean adolescents

Jae Hyun Kim, Euncheol Park, Sang Gyu Lee, Ki Bong Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the hypothesis that respondents with any of three specific sleep patterns would have a higher likelihood of suicidality than those without reports of these patterns in Korean adolescents. Setting: Data from the 2011-2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were used. Participants: 191 642 subjects were included. The survey's target population was students in grades 7 through 12 in South Korea. Independent variable: Sleep time. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts. Results: The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with very short or long time in bed were 1.487-fold higher (95% CI 1.219 to 1.815) or 0.611-fold lower (95% CI 0.460 to 0.811), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; the odds were similar for suicidal plans. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early or late awakening times were 1.231- fold higher (95% CI 1.050 to 1.442) or 1.528-fold lower (95% CI 1.000 to 2.334), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; these odds were lower for suicidal plans and attempts. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early bedtime were 1.748- fold higher (95% CI 1.302 to 2.346), the odds of suicidal plans in people with an early bedtime were 2.494-fold higher (95% CI 1.671 to 3.722) and the odds of suicide attempts in subjects with late bedtime were 1.313-fold higher (95% CI 1.005 to 1.716) than for subjects with a bedtime of 23:00. Conclusions: The sleep-related time is associated with suicide-related behaviours in Korean adolescents. Multilateral approaches are needed to identify the greatest risk factors for suicidal behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere008766
JournalBMJ Open
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Sleep
Suicide
Republic of Korea
Health Services Needs and Demand
Korea
Risk-Taking
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Associations between time in bed and suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts in Korean adolescents",
abstract = "Objectives: To examine the hypothesis that respondents with any of three specific sleep patterns would have a higher likelihood of suicidality than those without reports of these patterns in Korean adolescents. Setting: Data from the 2011-2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were used. Participants: 191 642 subjects were included. The survey's target population was students in grades 7 through 12 in South Korea. Independent variable: Sleep time. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts. Results: The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with very short or long time in bed were 1.487-fold higher (95{\%} CI 1.219 to 1.815) or 0.611-fold lower (95{\%} CI 0.460 to 0.811), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; the odds were similar for suicidal plans. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early or late awakening times were 1.231- fold higher (95{\%} CI 1.050 to 1.442) or 1.528-fold lower (95{\%} CI 1.000 to 2.334), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; these odds were lower for suicidal plans and attempts. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early bedtime were 1.748- fold higher (95{\%} CI 1.302 to 2.346), the odds of suicidal plans in people with an early bedtime were 2.494-fold higher (95{\%} CI 1.671 to 3.722) and the odds of suicide attempts in subjects with late bedtime were 1.313-fold higher (95{\%} CI 1.005 to 1.716) than for subjects with a bedtime of 23:00. Conclusions: The sleep-related time is associated with suicide-related behaviours in Korean adolescents. Multilateral approaches are needed to identify the greatest risk factors for suicidal behaviours.",
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Associations between time in bed and suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts in Korean adolescents. / Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Euncheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Yoo, Ki Bong.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 5, No. 9, e008766, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Associations between time in bed and suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts in Korean adolescents

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N2 - Objectives: To examine the hypothesis that respondents with any of three specific sleep patterns would have a higher likelihood of suicidality than those without reports of these patterns in Korean adolescents. Setting: Data from the 2011-2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were used. Participants: 191 642 subjects were included. The survey's target population was students in grades 7 through 12 in South Korea. Independent variable: Sleep time. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts. Results: The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with very short or long time in bed were 1.487-fold higher (95% CI 1.219 to 1.815) or 0.611-fold lower (95% CI 0.460 to 0.811), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; the odds were similar for suicidal plans. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early or late awakening times were 1.231- fold higher (95% CI 1.050 to 1.442) or 1.528-fold lower (95% CI 1.000 to 2.334), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; these odds were lower for suicidal plans and attempts. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early bedtime were 1.748- fold higher (95% CI 1.302 to 2.346), the odds of suicidal plans in people with an early bedtime were 2.494-fold higher (95% CI 1.671 to 3.722) and the odds of suicide attempts in subjects with late bedtime were 1.313-fold higher (95% CI 1.005 to 1.716) than for subjects with a bedtime of 23:00. Conclusions: The sleep-related time is associated with suicide-related behaviours in Korean adolescents. Multilateral approaches are needed to identify the greatest risk factors for suicidal behaviours.

AB - Objectives: To examine the hypothesis that respondents with any of three specific sleep patterns would have a higher likelihood of suicidality than those without reports of these patterns in Korean adolescents. Setting: Data from the 2011-2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were used. Participants: 191 642 subjects were included. The survey's target population was students in grades 7 through 12 in South Korea. Independent variable: Sleep time. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Suicidal thoughts, plans and attempts. Results: The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with very short or long time in bed were 1.487-fold higher (95% CI 1.219 to 1.815) or 0.611-fold lower (95% CI 0.460 to 0.811), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; the odds were similar for suicidal plans. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early or late awakening times were 1.231- fold higher (95% CI 1.050 to 1.442) or 1.528-fold lower (95% CI 1.000 to 2.334), respectively, than for subjects with 7 h/day in bed; these odds were lower for suicidal plans and attempts. The odds of suicidal thoughts in subjects with early bedtime were 1.748- fold higher (95% CI 1.302 to 2.346), the odds of suicidal plans in people with an early bedtime were 2.494-fold higher (95% CI 1.671 to 3.722) and the odds of suicide attempts in subjects with late bedtime were 1.313-fold higher (95% CI 1.005 to 1.716) than for subjects with a bedtime of 23:00. Conclusions: The sleep-related time is associated with suicide-related behaviours in Korean adolescents. Multilateral approaches are needed to identify the greatest risk factors for suicidal behaviours.

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