Associations of sitting time and occupation with metabolic syndrome in South Korean adults: A cross-sectional study

Jin Young Nam, Juyoung Kim, Kyung Hee Cho, Young Choi, Jaewoo Choi, Jaeyong Shin, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous evidence suggests that there is a correlation between prolonged sitting time and cardio-metabolic disease, such as metabolic syndrome (MS). Cardiovascular disease is the second-leading cause of mortality in South Korea, a country with the longest working hours among all member states of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. However, no previous study has investigated the relationships of overall sitting-time and occupation with MS in South Korea. Accordingly, the present study examined these relationships in a South Korean population. Methods: Data from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationally representative survey with a cross-sectional design, were used in the present study. MS diagnoses were evaluated using the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria. Participants self-reported their overall sitting times, and occupations were classified using the Korean version of the Standard Classification of Occupations (KSCO). A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations of sitting time and occupation with MS. Results: The risk of MS was 1.21-fold higher among participants who sat for >7 h/day than among those who sat for ≤7 h/day (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.46). Regarding occupation, office workers had a two-fold higher risk of MS than did agriculture, forestry, and fishery (AFF) workers (OR: 2.01, 95 % CI: 1.26-3.22). In a combined analysis of sitting time and occupation, male participants who sat for >7 h/day and reported an occupation that involves office work (OW) or machine fitting (MF) were significantly more likely to have MS when compared to those who sat for ≤7 h/day and were employed as AFF workers (>7 h/day × OW, OR: 2.41, 95 % CI: 1.05-5.51; >7 h/day × MF, OR: 2.92, 95 % CI: 1.43-5.93). Conclusions: Excessive sitting time and a sedentary occupation correlated positively with MS in South Korean adults. Accordingly, a reduction in the overall sitting time or inclusion of energy-expending activities in the workplace might improve the rate of MS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number943
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 7

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Occupations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Forestry
Fisheries
Republic of Korea
Agriculture
Nutrition Surveys
Metabolic Diseases
Workplace
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Mortality
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nam, Jin Young ; Kim, Juyoung ; Cho, Kyung Hee ; Choi, Young ; Choi, Jaewoo ; Shin, Jaeyong ; Park, Euncheol. / Associations of sitting time and occupation with metabolic syndrome in South Korean adults : A cross-sectional study. In: BMC Public Health. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.
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title = "Associations of sitting time and occupation with metabolic syndrome in South Korean adults: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: Previous evidence suggests that there is a correlation between prolonged sitting time and cardio-metabolic disease, such as metabolic syndrome (MS). Cardiovascular disease is the second-leading cause of mortality in South Korea, a country with the longest working hours among all member states of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. However, no previous study has investigated the relationships of overall sitting-time and occupation with MS in South Korea. Accordingly, the present study examined these relationships in a South Korean population. Methods: Data from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationally representative survey with a cross-sectional design, were used in the present study. MS diagnoses were evaluated using the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria. Participants self-reported their overall sitting times, and occupations were classified using the Korean version of the Standard Classification of Occupations (KSCO). A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations of sitting time and occupation with MS. Results: The risk of MS was 1.21-fold higher among participants who sat for >7 h/day than among those who sat for ≤7 h/day (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95 {\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.46). Regarding occupation, office workers had a two-fold higher risk of MS than did agriculture, forestry, and fishery (AFF) workers (OR: 2.01, 95 {\%} CI: 1.26-3.22). In a combined analysis of sitting time and occupation, male participants who sat for >7 h/day and reported an occupation that involves office work (OW) or machine fitting (MF) were significantly more likely to have MS when compared to those who sat for ≤7 h/day and were employed as AFF workers (>7 h/day × OW, OR: 2.41, 95 {\%} CI: 1.05-5.51; >7 h/day × MF, OR: 2.92, 95 {\%} CI: 1.43-5.93). Conclusions: Excessive sitting time and a sedentary occupation correlated positively with MS in South Korean adults. Accordingly, a reduction in the overall sitting time or inclusion of energy-expending activities in the workplace might improve the rate of MS.",
author = "Nam, {Jin Young} and Juyoung Kim and Cho, {Kyung Hee} and Young Choi and Jaewoo Choi and Jaeyong Shin and Euncheol Park",
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Associations of sitting time and occupation with metabolic syndrome in South Korean adults : A cross-sectional study. / Nam, Jin Young; Kim, Juyoung; Cho, Kyung Hee; Choi, Young; Choi, Jaewoo; Shin, Jaeyong; Park, Euncheol.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 16, No. 1, 943, 07.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of sitting time and occupation with metabolic syndrome in South Korean adults

T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Nam, Jin Young

AU - Kim, Juyoung

AU - Cho, Kyung Hee

AU - Choi, Young

AU - Choi, Jaewoo

AU - Shin, Jaeyong

AU - Park, Euncheol

PY - 2016/9/7

Y1 - 2016/9/7

N2 - Background: Previous evidence suggests that there is a correlation between prolonged sitting time and cardio-metabolic disease, such as metabolic syndrome (MS). Cardiovascular disease is the second-leading cause of mortality in South Korea, a country with the longest working hours among all member states of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. However, no previous study has investigated the relationships of overall sitting-time and occupation with MS in South Korea. Accordingly, the present study examined these relationships in a South Korean population. Methods: Data from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationally representative survey with a cross-sectional design, were used in the present study. MS diagnoses were evaluated using the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria. Participants self-reported their overall sitting times, and occupations were classified using the Korean version of the Standard Classification of Occupations (KSCO). A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations of sitting time and occupation with MS. Results: The risk of MS was 1.21-fold higher among participants who sat for >7 h/day than among those who sat for ≤7 h/day (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.46). Regarding occupation, office workers had a two-fold higher risk of MS than did agriculture, forestry, and fishery (AFF) workers (OR: 2.01, 95 % CI: 1.26-3.22). In a combined analysis of sitting time and occupation, male participants who sat for >7 h/day and reported an occupation that involves office work (OW) or machine fitting (MF) were significantly more likely to have MS when compared to those who sat for ≤7 h/day and were employed as AFF workers (>7 h/day × OW, OR: 2.41, 95 % CI: 1.05-5.51; >7 h/day × MF, OR: 2.92, 95 % CI: 1.43-5.93). Conclusions: Excessive sitting time and a sedentary occupation correlated positively with MS in South Korean adults. Accordingly, a reduction in the overall sitting time or inclusion of energy-expending activities in the workplace might improve the rate of MS.

AB - Background: Previous evidence suggests that there is a correlation between prolonged sitting time and cardio-metabolic disease, such as metabolic syndrome (MS). Cardiovascular disease is the second-leading cause of mortality in South Korea, a country with the longest working hours among all member states of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. However, no previous study has investigated the relationships of overall sitting-time and occupation with MS in South Korea. Accordingly, the present study examined these relationships in a South Korean population. Methods: Data from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), a nationally representative survey with a cross-sectional design, were used in the present study. MS diagnoses were evaluated using the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria. Participants self-reported their overall sitting times, and occupations were classified using the Korean version of the Standard Classification of Occupations (KSCO). A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations of sitting time and occupation with MS. Results: The risk of MS was 1.21-fold higher among participants who sat for >7 h/day than among those who sat for ≤7 h/day (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.46). Regarding occupation, office workers had a two-fold higher risk of MS than did agriculture, forestry, and fishery (AFF) workers (OR: 2.01, 95 % CI: 1.26-3.22). In a combined analysis of sitting time and occupation, male participants who sat for >7 h/day and reported an occupation that involves office work (OW) or machine fitting (MF) were significantly more likely to have MS when compared to those who sat for ≤7 h/day and were employed as AFF workers (>7 h/day × OW, OR: 2.41, 95 % CI: 1.05-5.51; >7 h/day × MF, OR: 2.92, 95 % CI: 1.43-5.93). Conclusions: Excessive sitting time and a sedentary occupation correlated positively with MS in South Korean adults. Accordingly, a reduction in the overall sitting time or inclusion of energy-expending activities in the workplace might improve the rate of MS.

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