At the movies

How external cues and perceived taste impact consumption volume

Brian Wansink, Se-Bum Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

External cues such as packaging and container size can powerfully and unknowingly increase how much food a person consumes. Do they still, however, stimulate consumption as the perceived favorability of a food declines? This was examined with popcorn in a theatre setting. Moviegoers who had rated the popcorn as tasting relatively unfavorable ate 61% more popcorn if randomly given a large container than a smaller one. Moviegoers who had rated the popcorn as relatively favorable ate 49% more when the container size was increased (and were likely to eat greater amounts if accompanied with a person of the opposite sex). One reason for this increase was that consumers had more difficulty monitoring how much they ate from large containers. Implications for raising the consumption levels of healthy, but unfavorable foods are investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-74
Number of pages6
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jan 1

Fingerprint

popcorn
Motion Pictures
Cues
containers
Food
Product Packaging
performing arts
packaging
monitoring
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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At the movies : How external cues and perceived taste impact consumption volume. / Wansink, Brian; Park, Se-Bum.

In: Food Quality and Preference, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 69-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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