Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients

Young Ho Yun, Kyung Hee Han, Sohee Park, Byeong Woo Park, Chi Heum Cho, Sung Kim, Dae Ho Lee, Soon Nam Lee, Eun Sook Lee, Jung Hun Kang, Si Young Kim, Jung Lim Lee, Dae Seog Heo, Chang Geol Lee, Yeun Keun Lim, Sam Yong Kim, Jong Soo Choi, Hyun Sik Jeong, Mison Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Whereas most studies have focused on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, few have dealt comprehensively with other critical interventions administered at the end of life. We surveyed cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public to determine their attitudes toward such interventions. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to four groups about their attitudes toward five end-of-life interventions - withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment, active pain control, withholding of life-sustaining measures, active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. We performed multivariable analyses to compare attitudes and to identify socio - demographic characteristics associated with the attitudes. Results: A total of 3840 individuals - 1242 cancer patients, 1289 family caregivers and 303 oncologists from 17 hospitals, as well as 1006 members of the general Korean population - participated in the survey. A large ma jority in each of the groups supported withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment (87.1%-94.0%) and use of active pain control (89.0%-98.4%). A smaller majority (60.8%-76.0%) supported withholding of life- sustaining treatment. About 50% of those in the patient and general population groups supported active euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, as compared with less than 40% of the family caregivers and less than 10% of the oncologists. Higher income was significantly associated with approval of the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the practice of active pain control. Older age, male sex and having no religion were significantly associated with approval of withholding of life-sustaining measures. Older age, male sex, having no religion and lower education level were significantly associated with approval of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Interpretation: Although the various participant groups shared the same attitude toward futile and ameliorative end-of-life care (the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the use of active pain control), oncologists had a more negative attitude than those in the other groups toward the active ending of life (euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E673-E679
JournalCMAJ
Volume183
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 12

Fingerprint

Terminally Ill
Caregivers
Assisted Suicide
Active Euthanasia
Neoplasms
Pain
Euthanasia
Religion
Oncologists
Therapeutics
Terminal Care
Population Groups
Demography
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yun, Young Ho ; Han, Kyung Hee ; Park, Sohee ; Park, Byeong Woo ; Cho, Chi Heum ; Kim, Sung ; Lee, Dae Ho ; Lee, Soon Nam ; Lee, Eun Sook ; Kang, Jung Hun ; Kim, Si Young ; Lee, Jung Lim ; Heo, Dae Seog ; Lee, Chang Geol ; Lim, Yeun Keun ; Kim, Sam Yong ; Choi, Jong Soo ; Jeong, Hyun Sik ; Chun, Mison. / Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients. In: CMAJ. 2011 ; Vol. 183, No. 10. pp. E673-E679.
@article{cbc76ed47cfd4916a264efd3e4b205e7,
title = "Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients",
abstract = "Background: Whereas most studies have focused on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, few have dealt comprehensively with other critical interventions administered at the end of life. We surveyed cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public to determine their attitudes toward such interventions. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to four groups about their attitudes toward five end-of-life interventions - withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment, active pain control, withholding of life-sustaining measures, active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. We performed multivariable analyses to compare attitudes and to identify socio - demographic characteristics associated with the attitudes. Results: A total of 3840 individuals - 1242 cancer patients, 1289 family caregivers and 303 oncologists from 17 hospitals, as well as 1006 members of the general Korean population - participated in the survey. A large ma jority in each of the groups supported withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment (87.1{\%}-94.0{\%}) and use of active pain control (89.0{\%}-98.4{\%}). A smaller majority (60.8{\%}-76.0{\%}) supported withholding of life- sustaining treatment. About 50{\%} of those in the patient and general population groups supported active euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, as compared with less than 40{\%} of the family caregivers and less than 10{\%} of the oncologists. Higher income was significantly associated with approval of the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the practice of active pain control. Older age, male sex and having no religion were significantly associated with approval of withholding of life-sustaining measures. Older age, male sex, having no religion and lower education level were significantly associated with approval of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Interpretation: Although the various participant groups shared the same attitude toward futile and ameliorative end-of-life care (the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the use of active pain control), oncologists had a more negative attitude than those in the other groups toward the active ending of life (euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide).",
author = "Yun, {Young Ho} and Han, {Kyung Hee} and Sohee Park and Park, {Byeong Woo} and Cho, {Chi Heum} and Sung Kim and Lee, {Dae Ho} and Lee, {Soon Nam} and Lee, {Eun Sook} and Kang, {Jung Hun} and Kim, {Si Young} and Lee, {Jung Lim} and Heo, {Dae Seog} and Lee, {Chang Geol} and Lim, {Yeun Keun} and Kim, {Sam Yong} and Choi, {Jong Soo} and Jeong, {Hyun Sik} and Mison Chun",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1503/cmaj.110020",
language = "English",
volume = "183",
pages = "E673--E679",
journal = "CMAJ",
issn = "0008-4409",
publisher = "Canadian Medical Association",
number = "10",

}

Yun, YH, Han, KH, Park, S, Park, BW, Cho, CH, Kim, S, Lee, DH, Lee, SN, Lee, ES, Kang, JH, Kim, SY, Lee, JL, Heo, DS, Lee, CG, Lim, YK, Kim, SY, Choi, JS, Jeong, HS & Chun, M 2011, 'Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients', CMAJ, vol. 183, no. 10, pp. E673-E679. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.110020

Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients. / Yun, Young Ho; Han, Kyung Hee; Park, Sohee; Park, Byeong Woo; Cho, Chi Heum; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Ho; Lee, Soon Nam; Lee, Eun Sook; Kang, Jung Hun; Kim, Si Young; Lee, Jung Lim; Heo, Dae Seog; Lee, Chang Geol; Lim, Yeun Keun; Kim, Sam Yong; Choi, Jong Soo; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Chun, Mison.

In: CMAJ, Vol. 183, No. 10, 12.07.2011, p. E673-E679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attitudes of cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public toward critical interventions at the end of life of terminally ill patients

AU - Yun, Young Ho

AU - Han, Kyung Hee

AU - Park, Sohee

AU - Park, Byeong Woo

AU - Cho, Chi Heum

AU - Kim, Sung

AU - Lee, Dae Ho

AU - Lee, Soon Nam

AU - Lee, Eun Sook

AU - Kang, Jung Hun

AU - Kim, Si Young

AU - Lee, Jung Lim

AU - Heo, Dae Seog

AU - Lee, Chang Geol

AU - Lim, Yeun Keun

AU - Kim, Sam Yong

AU - Choi, Jong Soo

AU - Jeong, Hyun Sik

AU - Chun, Mison

PY - 2011/7/12

Y1 - 2011/7/12

N2 - Background: Whereas most studies have focused on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, few have dealt comprehensively with other critical interventions administered at the end of life. We surveyed cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public to determine their attitudes toward such interventions. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to four groups about their attitudes toward five end-of-life interventions - withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment, active pain control, withholding of life-sustaining measures, active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. We performed multivariable analyses to compare attitudes and to identify socio - demographic characteristics associated with the attitudes. Results: A total of 3840 individuals - 1242 cancer patients, 1289 family caregivers and 303 oncologists from 17 hospitals, as well as 1006 members of the general Korean population - participated in the survey. A large ma jority in each of the groups supported withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment (87.1%-94.0%) and use of active pain control (89.0%-98.4%). A smaller majority (60.8%-76.0%) supported withholding of life- sustaining treatment. About 50% of those in the patient and general population groups supported active euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, as compared with less than 40% of the family caregivers and less than 10% of the oncologists. Higher income was significantly associated with approval of the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the practice of active pain control. Older age, male sex and having no religion were significantly associated with approval of withholding of life-sustaining measures. Older age, male sex, having no religion and lower education level were significantly associated with approval of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Interpretation: Although the various participant groups shared the same attitude toward futile and ameliorative end-of-life care (the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the use of active pain control), oncologists had a more negative attitude than those in the other groups toward the active ending of life (euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide).

AB - Background: Whereas most studies have focused on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, few have dealt comprehensively with other critical interventions administered at the end of life. We surveyed cancer patients, family caregivers, oncologists and members of the general public to determine their attitudes toward such interventions. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to four groups about their attitudes toward five end-of-life interventions - withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment, active pain control, withholding of life-sustaining measures, active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. We performed multivariable analyses to compare attitudes and to identify socio - demographic characteristics associated with the attitudes. Results: A total of 3840 individuals - 1242 cancer patients, 1289 family caregivers and 303 oncologists from 17 hospitals, as well as 1006 members of the general Korean population - participated in the survey. A large ma jority in each of the groups supported withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment (87.1%-94.0%) and use of active pain control (89.0%-98.4%). A smaller majority (60.8%-76.0%) supported withholding of life- sustaining treatment. About 50% of those in the patient and general population groups supported active euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, as compared with less than 40% of the family caregivers and less than 10% of the oncologists. Higher income was significantly associated with approval of the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the practice of active pain control. Older age, male sex and having no religion were significantly associated with approval of withholding of life-sustaining measures. Older age, male sex, having no religion and lower education level were significantly associated with approval of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Interpretation: Although the various participant groups shared the same attitude toward futile and ameliorative end-of-life care (the withdrawal of futile life-sustaining treatment and the use of active pain control), oncologists had a more negative attitude than those in the other groups toward the active ending of life (euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960164261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960164261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1503/cmaj.110020

DO - 10.1503/cmaj.110020

M3 - Article

C2 - 21624907

AN - SCOPUS:79960164261

VL - 183

SP - E673-E679

JO - CMAJ

JF - CMAJ

SN - 0008-4409

IS - 10

ER -