Bayesian networks + reinforcement learning: Controlling group emotion from sensory stimuli

Seul Gi Choi, Sung Bae Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As communication technology develops, various sensory stimuli can be collected in service spaces. To enhance the service effectiveness, it is important to determine the optimal stimuli to induce group emotion in the service space to the target emotion. In this paper, we propose a stimuli control system to adjust the group emotion. It is a stand-alone system that can determine optimal stimuli by utility table and modular tree-structured Bayesian networks designed for emotion prediction model proposed in the previous study. To verify the proposed system, we collected data using several scenarios at a kindergarten and a senior welfare center. Each space is equipped with sensors for collection and equipment for controlling stimuli. As a result, the system shows a performance of 78% in the kindergarten and 80% in the senior welfare center. The proposed method shows much better performance than other classification methods with lower complexity. Also, reinforcement learning is applied to improving the accuracy of stimuli decision for a positive effect on system performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-364
Number of pages10
JournalNeurocomputing
Volume391
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 28

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Institute of Information & Communications Technology Planning & Evaluation (IITP) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) [2016-0-00562(R0124-16-0002), Emotional Intelligence Technology to Infer Human Emotion and Carry on Dialogue Accordingly]. S.-G. Choi is an M.S. candidate in computer science at Yonsei University. Her research interests include Bayesian modeling and affective computing. S.-B. Cho received the B.S. degree in computer science from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), Taejeon, Korea. He was an Invited Researcher of Human Information Processing Research Laboratories at ATR (Advanced Telecommunications Research) Institute, Kyoto, Japan from 1993 to 1995, and a Visiting Scholar at University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia in 1998. He was also a Visiting Professor at University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada from 2005 to 2006. Since 1995, he has been a Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Yonsei University. His research interests include neural networks, pattern recognition, intelligent man-machine interfaces, evolutionary computation, and artificial life. He was awarded outstanding paper prizes from the IEEE Korea Section in 1989 and 1992, and another one from the Korea Information Science Society in 1990. He was also the recipient of the Richard E. Merwin prize from the IEEE Computer Society in 1993. He was listed in Who's Who in Pattern Recognition from the International Association for Pattern Recognition in 1994, and received the best paper awards at International Conference on Soft Computing in 1996 and 1998. Also, he received the best paper award at World Automation Congress in 1998, and listed in Marquis Who's Who in Science and Engineering in 2000 and in Marquis Who's Who in the World in 2001. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and a Member of the Korea Information Science Society, INNS, the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society, and the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Institute of Information & Communications Technology Planning & Evaluation (IITP) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) [2016-0-00562(R0124-16-0002), Emotional Intelligence Technology to Infer Human Emotion and Carry on Dialogue Accordingly].

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Artificial Intelligence

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