Becoming Citizens

Youths' Civic Uses of New Media in Five Digital Cities in East Asia

Wan Ying Lin, Pauline Hope Cheong, Yong-Chan Kim, Joo Young Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Asian youths are embracing communication technologies at a burgeoning rate, yet interesting differences in Internet access and use exist among this younger generation. Our empirical investigation provides a rich and comparative look into what Asian youths do online, with an emphasis on an understudied area: their civic uses of new media. Data collected among youths aged between 12 and 17 in Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei, and Tokyo in 2007 show that this 'digital generation' has grown up with computers and the Internet, with 96% of them being internet users, and having 6 years of computer experience on average. Our results suggest that the Internet may facilitate citizenship among Asian youths although entertainment-related activities such as downloading music or playing games remain the most popular activities online. Sixty-five percent of them read online news, almost half of them have ever cast a vote on the Internet, and every one in five has signed an online petition. Differences in Internet usage and civic behaviors among youths in five cities are presented, suggesting the contextual nature of Internet use influenced by civic culture.The paper concludes with a discussion of differences in Internet use among Asian youths between 2001 and 2007, together with research implications for better understanding this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-857
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 6

Fingerprint

Far East
Internet
new media
citizen
Tokyo
petition
Singapore
Hong Kong
Music
entertainment
communication technology
voter
citizenship
news
music
Communication
Technology
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Lin, Wan Ying ; Cheong, Pauline Hope ; Kim, Yong-Chan ; Jung, Joo Young. / Becoming Citizens : Youths' Civic Uses of New Media in Five Digital Cities in East Asia. In: Journal of Adolescent Research. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 839-857.
@article{e1dfd744927d427f9ed0775b18bfe2c1,
title = "Becoming Citizens: Youths' Civic Uses of New Media in Five Digital Cities in East Asia",
abstract = "Asian youths are embracing communication technologies at a burgeoning rate, yet interesting differences in Internet access and use exist among this younger generation. Our empirical investigation provides a rich and comparative look into what Asian youths do online, with an emphasis on an understudied area: their civic uses of new media. Data collected among youths aged between 12 and 17 in Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei, and Tokyo in 2007 show that this 'digital generation' has grown up with computers and the Internet, with 96{\%} of them being internet users, and having 6 years of computer experience on average. Our results suggest that the Internet may facilitate citizenship among Asian youths although entertainment-related activities such as downloading music or playing games remain the most popular activities online. Sixty-five percent of them read online news, almost half of them have ever cast a vote on the Internet, and every one in five has signed an online petition. Differences in Internet usage and civic behaviors among youths in five cities are presented, suggesting the contextual nature of Internet use influenced by civic culture.The paper concludes with a discussion of differences in Internet use among Asian youths between 2001 and 2007, together with research implications for better understanding this population.",
author = "Lin, {Wan Ying} and Cheong, {Pauline Hope} and Yong-Chan Kim and Jung, {Joo Young}",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1177/0743558410371125",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "839--857",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Research",
issn = "0743-5584",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

Becoming Citizens : Youths' Civic Uses of New Media in Five Digital Cities in East Asia. / Lin, Wan Ying; Cheong, Pauline Hope; Kim, Yong-Chan; Jung, Joo Young.

In: Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 25, No. 6, 06.10.2010, p. 839-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Becoming Citizens

T2 - Youths' Civic Uses of New Media in Five Digital Cities in East Asia

AU - Lin, Wan Ying

AU - Cheong, Pauline Hope

AU - Kim, Yong-Chan

AU - Jung, Joo Young

PY - 2010/10/6

Y1 - 2010/10/6

N2 - Asian youths are embracing communication technologies at a burgeoning rate, yet interesting differences in Internet access and use exist among this younger generation. Our empirical investigation provides a rich and comparative look into what Asian youths do online, with an emphasis on an understudied area: their civic uses of new media. Data collected among youths aged between 12 and 17 in Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei, and Tokyo in 2007 show that this 'digital generation' has grown up with computers and the Internet, with 96% of them being internet users, and having 6 years of computer experience on average. Our results suggest that the Internet may facilitate citizenship among Asian youths although entertainment-related activities such as downloading music or playing games remain the most popular activities online. Sixty-five percent of them read online news, almost half of them have ever cast a vote on the Internet, and every one in five has signed an online petition. Differences in Internet usage and civic behaviors among youths in five cities are presented, suggesting the contextual nature of Internet use influenced by civic culture.The paper concludes with a discussion of differences in Internet use among Asian youths between 2001 and 2007, together with research implications for better understanding this population.

AB - Asian youths are embracing communication technologies at a burgeoning rate, yet interesting differences in Internet access and use exist among this younger generation. Our empirical investigation provides a rich and comparative look into what Asian youths do online, with an emphasis on an understudied area: their civic uses of new media. Data collected among youths aged between 12 and 17 in Hong Kong, Seoul, Singapore, Taipei, and Tokyo in 2007 show that this 'digital generation' has grown up with computers and the Internet, with 96% of them being internet users, and having 6 years of computer experience on average. Our results suggest that the Internet may facilitate citizenship among Asian youths although entertainment-related activities such as downloading music or playing games remain the most popular activities online. Sixty-five percent of them read online news, almost half of them have ever cast a vote on the Internet, and every one in five has signed an online petition. Differences in Internet usage and civic behaviors among youths in five cities are presented, suggesting the contextual nature of Internet use influenced by civic culture.The paper concludes with a discussion of differences in Internet use among Asian youths between 2001 and 2007, together with research implications for better understanding this population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957259824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957259824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0743558410371125

DO - 10.1177/0743558410371125

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 839

EP - 857

JO - Journal of Adolescent Research

JF - Journal of Adolescent Research

SN - 0743-5584

IS - 6

ER -