Beliefs about health, smoking, and future smoking cessation among South Korean men hospitalized for cardiovascular disease

Min Sohn, Nancy A. Stotts, Neal Benowitz, Dianne Christopherson, Kyung Soo Kim, Yang Soo Jang, Mi Sook Ahn, Erika Sivarajan Froelicher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A particularly high rate of smoking among South Korean men corresponds to high rates of cardiovascular disease. Objectives: This study evaluated South Korean men hospitalized with cardiovascular disease to explore beliefs about the health benefits of smoking cessation, to determine smoking cessation intentions, and to identify factors associated with confidence in quitting smoking. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: Of the study's 97 participants, only 78% believed that smoking cessation avoids or decreases the chance of developing heart disease; 93% reported their intention to quit; 74% had moderate to high confidence about quitting within the month after hospital discharge; and 88% preferred to quit by themselves without help. Significant predictors of low confidence in quitting were being married (odds ratio: 5.54, 95% confidence interval: 1.33-23.08); being alcohol dependent (odds ratio: 3.25, confidence interval: 1.20-8.80); and starting to smoke at or before 20 years of age (odds ratio: 2.96, confidence interval: 1.14-7.68). Conclusion: The study's participants were motivated to quit smoking for their health, but they must be educated to understand that smoking is addictive and that special intervention is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-347
Number of pages9
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Sep

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Beliefs about health, smoking, and future smoking cessation among South Korean men hospitalized for cardiovascular disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this