Biohybrid nanofibers containing manganese oxide–forming fungi for heavy metal removal from water

Yaewon Park, Shuang Liu, Terrence Gardner, Drake Johnson, Aaron Keeler, Nathalia Ortiz, Ghada Rabah, Ericka Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Manganese-oxidizing fungi support bioremediation through the conversion of manganese ions into manganese oxide deposits that in turn adsorb manganese and other heavy metal ions from the environment. Manganese-oxidizing fungi were immobilized onto nanofiber surfaces to assist remediation of heavy metal–contaminated water. Two fungal isolates, Coniothyrium sp. and Coprinellus sp., from a Superfund site (Lot 86, Farm Unit #1) water treatment system were incubated in the presence of nanofibers. Fungal hyphae had strong association with nanofiber surfaces. Upon fungal attachment to manganese chloride–seeded nanofibers, Coniothyrium sp. catalyzed the conformal deposition of manganese oxide along hyphae and nanofibers, but Coprinellus sp. catalyzed manganese oxide only along its hyphae. Fungi–nanofiber hybrids removed various heavy metals from the water. Heavy metal ions were adsorbed into manganese oxide crystalline structure, possibly by ion exchange with manganese within the manganese oxide. Hybrid materials of fungal hyphae and manganese oxides confined to nanofiber-adsorbed heavy metal ions from water.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Engineered Fibers and Fabrics
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Water Resources Research Institute – North Carolina Sea Grant (WRRI-NCSG) provided support for this graduate research (WRRI Project No. 17-02-SG & Sea Grant Project No. R/MG-1708) Work from project 14-177 NC with The Nonwovens Institute was featured in this study. This work was performed in part at the Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) at North Carolina State University, which is supported by the State of North Carolina and the National Science Foundation (award number ECCS-1542015). AIF is a member of the North Carolina Research Triangle Nanotechnology Network (RTNN), a site in the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI). Support was received from the National Science Foundation Environmental Chemical Sciences Program (award CHE–1407180) and NCSU Research Innovation and Seed Funding program.

Funding Information:
Yaewon Park?s current address is The Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). A portion of this work was conducted at Smithsonian Institution. We thank Bruce Stewart, Cara Santelli, Dominique Caput and Owen Duckworth for their contributions at various stages of the overall biogeochemical study. We appreciate Evan Kane at Wake County Department of Environmental Services for the groundwater sample. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Water Resources Research Institute ? North Carolina Sea Grant (WRRI-NCSG) provided support for this graduate research (WRRI Project No. 17-02-SG & Sea Grant Project No. R/MG-1708) Work from project 14-177 NC with The Nonwovens Institute was featured in this study. This work was performed in part at the Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) at North Carolina State University, which is supported by the State of North Carolina and the National Science Foundation (award number ECCS-1542015). AIF is a member of the North Carolina Research Triangle Nanotechnology Network (RTNN), a site in the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI). Support was received from the National Science Foundation Environmental Chemical Sciences Program (award CHE?1407180) and NCSU Research Innovation and Seed Funding program.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2020.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

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