Biomarker discovery from the plasma proteome using multidimensional fractionation proteomics

Hyoung Joo Lee, Eun Young Lee, Min Seok Kwon, Young Ki Paik

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because biomarkers are typically low in abundance, the crucial step of biomarker discovery is to efficiently separate clinically relevant sets of proteins that might define disease stages and/or predict disease development. It is anticipated that a multi-dimensional fractionation system (MDFS) will provide an efficient means of separating low abundance proteins from plasma proteins, resulting in the extension of the detection limit. However, when using an MDFS to analyze the plasma proteome it is important to consider how sample processing, yield, resolution and throughput potential may influence the detection limit. This review evaluates the recent advances in MDFS research with respect to '4RS criterion' (4R: resolution, reproducibility, recovery, and robustness; 4S: simplicity, speed, selectivity and sensitivity) and discusses perspectives for future plasma-derived biomarker discovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Biology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Proteome
Fractionation
Proteomics
Plasmas
Limit of Detection
Blood Proteins
Proteins
Throughput
Recovery
Processing
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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Biomarker discovery from the plasma proteome using multidimensional fractionation proteomics. / Lee, Hyoung Joo; Lee, Eun Young; Kwon, Min Seok; Paik, Young Ki.

In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.02.2006, p. 42-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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