Biomechanical effects of ball position on address position variables of elite golfers

Sung Eun Kim, Young Chul Koh, Joon Haeng Cho, Sae Yong Lee, Hae Dong Lee, Sung Cheol Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate address position variables in response to changes in ball position in golfers. Eleven male professional golfers were instructed to perform their golf swing. A three-dimensional motion analysis system, with eight infrared cameras and two force platforms, was used to capture the address positions. A golf ball has a diameter of 4.27 cm, and a radius of 2.14 cm. Even small movements of ball position in the mediolateral (M-L) and anteroposterior (A-P) directions significantly changed the address position. When the ball was moved to the left, the shoulder rotation and club-face aim rotated toward the left of the target, and the left vertical ground reaction force increased. When the ball was moved to the right, the opposite findings were observed. When the ball was moved closer, the trunk, hip, knee, ankle, and absolute arm angle extended; the lie angle of the golf club increased; and the center of pressure moved toward the posterior direction. These changes were reversed when the ball was moved further away. The M-L ball position critically changed the address positions of the upper extremities in the horizontal plane, and the A-P ball position critically changed the angles of whole body parts in the sagittal plane. Furthermore, club-head kinematics at impact such as club-face aim, club path, and angle of attack were significantly changed in the M-L ball position; and club-head speed and angle of attack were significantly changed in the A-P ball position. This in-depth understanding of the address position in association with the ball position could provide valuable data for swing coaches when finding a golfer’s optimal address position.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-598
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sports Science and Medicine
Volume17
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Golf
Head
Human Body
Biomechanical Phenomena
Ankle
Upper Extremity
Hip
Knee
Arm
Pressure
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Kim, Sung Eun ; Koh, Young Chul ; Cho, Joon Haeng ; Lee, Sae Yong ; Lee, Hae Dong ; Lee, Sung Cheol. / Biomechanical effects of ball position on address position variables of elite golfers. In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 589-598.
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Biomechanical effects of ball position on address position variables of elite golfers. / Kim, Sung Eun; Koh, Young Chul; Cho, Joon Haeng; Lee, Sae Yong; Lee, Hae Dong; Lee, Sung Cheol.

In: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.01.2018, p. 589-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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