Blood electrolytes exhibit a strong influence on the mobility of artificial catalytic microengines

Hong Wang, Guanjia Zhao, Martin Pumera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The developments in biomedical sciences foresee the inclusion of self-propelled catalytic micromotors for in vivo therapeutic strategies in the near future. We show here that blood electrolytes, such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cl-, SO42- and phosphates, decrease the mobility of the Pt catalyzed tubular microjets. This effect is significant and in many cases, the microjets are completely disabled at physiologically relevant concentrations of the ions. A strategy to counterbalance this negative influence is suggested. These findings have a strong influence in the field of bubble-propelled artificial micromotors, where applications in blood are often envisioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17277-17280
Number of pages4
JournalPhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume15
Issue number40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 28

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micromotors
Micromotors
Electrolytes
blood
Blood
electrolytes
counterbalances
phosphates
bubbles
Phosphates
inclusions
Ions
ions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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Blood electrolytes exhibit a strong influence on the mobility of artificial catalytic microengines. / Wang, Hong; Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin.

In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 15, No. 40, 28.10.2013, p. 17277-17280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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