Body weight status misperception and its association with weight control behaviours, depressive mood and psychological distress in nulliparous normal-weight young women

Kwang Mee Lee, Min Seok Seo, Jae Yong Shim, Yong Jae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Understanding body weight status dissatisfaction may be important for understanding weight control behaviours and mental health.Aims: To investigate the relationships between body weight status misperceptions in nulliparous normal-weight young women and weight control-related behaviours and mental health.Subjects and methods: Body weight perceptions, weight control methods, depressive mood and psychological distress were measured in 717 nulliparous normal-weight women, aged 18-40 years, who participated in the 2007-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES-IV).Results: Among 717 participants, 24 subjects (4.1 ± 1.0%) misperceived themselves to be underweight and 295 subjects (39.2 ± 2.2%) misperceived themselves to be overweight. Those with overweight misperceptions were more likely to fail to maintain their targeted body weights, despite weight control efforts (p < 0.001). Weight control behaviours such as taking diet pills were more common among women with overweight misperception (p < 0.001). Compared to the accurate body weight perception group, age-adjusted ORs for depressive mood and psychological distress were 1.82 (1.06-3.13) and 1.65 (1.10-2.47) in the overweight misperception group.Conclusions: Body weight status misperception may be important for understanding weight control-related behaviours and psychiatric illness among nulliparous normal-weight young women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)528-532
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of human biology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 2

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Physiology
  • Ageing
  • Genetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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