Body weight status misperception and its association with weight control behaviours, depressive mood and psychological distress in nulliparous normal-weight young women

Kwang Mee Lee, Min Seok Seo, Jae Yong Shim, Yongjae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding body weight status dissatisfaction may be important for understanding weight control behaviours and mental health.

AIMS: To investigate the relationships between body weight status misperceptions in nulliparous normal-weight young women and weight control-related behaviours and mental health.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Body weight perceptions, weight control methods, depressive mood and psychological distress were measured in 717 nulliparous normal-weight women, aged 18-40 years, who participated in the 2007-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES-IV).

RESULTS: Among 717 participants, 24 subjects (4.1 ± 1.0%) misperceived themselves to be underweight and 295 subjects (39.2 ± 2.2%) misperceived themselves to be overweight. Those with overweight misperceptions were more likely to fail to maintain their targeted body weights, despite weight control efforts (p < 0.001). Weight control behaviours such as taking diet pills were more common among women with overweight misperception (p < 0.001). Compared to the accurate body weight perception group, age-adjusted ORs for depressive mood and psychological distress were 1.82 (1.06-3.13) and 1.65 (1.10-2.47) in the overweight misperception group.

CONCLUSIONS: Body weight status misperception may be important for understanding weight control-related behaviours and psychiatric illness among nulliparous normal-weight young women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)528-532
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of human biology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Behavior Control
Body Weight
Psychology
Weights and Measures
Weight Perception
Mental Health
Illness Behavior
Thinness
Nutrition Surveys
Psychiatry
Age Groups
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Physiology
  • Ageing
  • Genetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Body weight status misperception and its association with weight control behaviours, depressive mood and psychological distress in nulliparous normal-weight young women",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Understanding body weight status dissatisfaction may be important for understanding weight control behaviours and mental health.AIMS: To investigate the relationships between body weight status misperceptions in nulliparous normal-weight young women and weight control-related behaviours and mental health.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Body weight perceptions, weight control methods, depressive mood and psychological distress were measured in 717 nulliparous normal-weight women, aged 18-40 years, who participated in the 2007-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES-IV).RESULTS: Among 717 participants, 24 subjects (4.1 ± 1.0{\%}) misperceived themselves to be underweight and 295 subjects (39.2 ± 2.2{\%}) misperceived themselves to be overweight. Those with overweight misperceptions were more likely to fail to maintain their targeted body weights, despite weight control efforts (p < 0.001). Weight control behaviours such as taking diet pills were more common among women with overweight misperception (p < 0.001). Compared to the accurate body weight perception group, age-adjusted ORs for depressive mood and psychological distress were 1.82 (1.06-3.13) and 1.65 (1.10-2.47) in the overweight misperception group.CONCLUSIONS: Body weight status misperception may be important for understanding weight control-related behaviours and psychiatric illness among nulliparous normal-weight young women.",
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Body weight status misperception and its association with weight control behaviours, depressive mood and psychological distress in nulliparous normal-weight young women. / Lee, Kwang Mee; Seo, Min Seok; Shim, Jae Yong; Lee, Yongjae.

In: Annals of human biology, Vol. 42, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 528-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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