Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation

J. Min, P. K. Chu, Y. C. Cheng, J. B. Liu, S. Im, S. Iyer, N. W. Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) is an attractive approach for fabricating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials for radiation-hardened electronic devices and high-speed CMOS circuits, the production cost is high. The novel technique of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) emulates the traditional beamline technique in many aspects. Some of the advantages are: no mass selection, no beam transport optics, large area implantation, high ion flux, short implantation time, and low costs. We used PIII and oxygen implantation (nominal dose: 5 × 1017 atoms/cm2) to form thin buried oxide layers in the sub-mtorr operating pressure regime. A 20-50 nm thick buried oxide layer with a Si overlayer thickness of 20-50 nm was fabricated in about 5 min. The implanted wafers were capped with a nitride layer and subsequently annealed for 6 h at 1300 °C in a nitrogen ambient to remove the damage. The resulting wafers were analyzed using a variety of techniques, including RBS and XTEM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-222
Number of pages4
JournalMaterials Chemistry & Physics
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 Apr

Fingerprint

Ion implantation
Oxides
submerging
ion implantation
implantation
Plasmas
oxides
wafers
production costs
Oxygen
oxygen
nitrides
Silicon
CMOS
Nitrides
high speed
insulators
optics
Costs
damage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Min, J., Chu, P. K., Cheng, Y. C., Liu, J. B., Im, S., Iyer, S., & Cheung, N. W. (1995). Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation. Materials Chemistry & Physics, 40(3), 219-222. https://doi.org/10.1016/0254-0584(95)01474-8
Min, J. ; Chu, P. K. ; Cheng, Y. C. ; Liu, J. B. ; Im, S. ; Iyer, S. ; Cheung, N. W. / Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation. In: Materials Chemistry & Physics. 1995 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 219-222.
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Min, J, Chu, PK, Cheng, YC, Liu, JB, Im, S, Iyer, S & Cheung, NW 1995, 'Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation', Materials Chemistry & Physics, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 219-222. https://doi.org/10.1016/0254-0584(95)01474-8

Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation. / Min, J.; Chu, P. K.; Cheng, Y. C.; Liu, J. B.; Im, S.; Iyer, S.; Cheung, N. W.

In: Materials Chemistry & Physics, Vol. 40, No. 3, 04.1995, p. 219-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Buried oxide formation by plasma immersion ion implantation

AU - Min, J.

AU - Chu, P. K.

AU - Cheng, Y. C.

AU - Liu, J. B.

AU - Im, S.

AU - Iyer, S.

AU - Cheung, N. W.

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