Caenorhabditis elegans calnexin is N-glycosylated and required for stress response

Wonhae Lee, Tae Hoon Lee, Byung Jae Park, Jong Wook Chang, Jae Ran Yu, Hyun Sook Koo, Hyun Park, Yung Joon Yoo, Joohong Ahnn

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calnexin, a type I integral Ca2+-binding protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, has been implicated in various biological functions including chaperone activity, calcium homeostasis, phagocytosis, and ER stress-induced apoptosis. Caenorhabditis elegans CNX-1 is expressed in the H-shaped excretory cell, intestine, dorsal and ventral nerve cord, spermatheca, and head and tail neurons throughout development. A cnx-1 null mutant displays temperature-sensitive developmental and reproductive defects, and retarded growth under stress. Moreover, a double knockout mutant of calnexin and calreticulin exhibits additive severe defects. Interestingly, both cnx-1 transcript and protein levels are elevated under stress conditions suggesting that CNX-1 may be important for stress-induced chaperoning functions in C. elegans. Glycosidase treatment and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that CeCNX-1 is N-glycosylated at two asparagine residues of Asn203 and Asn571. When transgenic animals from cnx-1 mutant were generated, a glycosylation defective construct failed to rescue phenotypes of cnx-1 mutant suggesting that glycosylation is important for calnexin's functions in C. elegans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1018-1030
Number of pages13
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume338
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 16

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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