Can diabetes patients seeking a second hospital get better care? Results from nested case–control study

Jae Hyun Kim, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates the effects of the number of medical institutions visited on risk of death. This study conducted a nested case-control design using the National Health Insurance Service–Senior database from 2002 to 2013. Cases were defined as those with death among outpatients who had first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (E10-E14) after entry into the base cohort and controls were selected by incidence density sampling and matched to cases based on age, and sex. Our main results were presented by conditional logistic regression for nested case-controls design. Of total 55,558 final study samples, there were 9,313 (16.8%) cases and 46,245 (83.2%) controls. With an increase by one point in the number of hospitals per medical utilization, risk of death significantly increased by 4.1% (odds ratio (OR): 1.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.039–1.043). In both medical utilization and number of hospitals, those with high medical utilization (OR: 1.065, 95% CI: 1.059–1.070) and number of hospitals (OR: 1.049, 95% CI: 1.041–1.058) for risk of death were significantly higher than those with low medical utilization (OR: 1.040, 95% CI: 1.037–1.043) and number of hospitals (OR: 1.029, 95% CI: 1.027–1.032), respectively. The number of medical institution visited was significantly associated with risk of death. Therefore, diabetics should be warned about the potential of risk of death incurred from excessive access to medical utilizations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0210809
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Medical problems
diabetes
odds ratio
confidence interval
death
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Health insurance
health insurance
National Health Programs
Logistics
diabetes mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus
Sampling
Outpatients
Logistic Models
Databases
incidence
sampling
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "This study investigates the effects of the number of medical institutions visited on risk of death. This study conducted a nested case-control design using the National Health Insurance Service–Senior database from 2002 to 2013. Cases were defined as those with death among outpatients who had first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (E10-E14) after entry into the base cohort and controls were selected by incidence density sampling and matched to cases based on age, and sex. Our main results were presented by conditional logistic regression for nested case-controls design. Of total 55,558 final study samples, there were 9,313 (16.8{\%}) cases and 46,245 (83.2{\%}) controls. With an increase by one point in the number of hospitals per medical utilization, risk of death significantly increased by 4.1{\%} (odds ratio (OR): 1.041, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.039–1.043). In both medical utilization and number of hospitals, those with high medical utilization (OR: 1.065, 95{\%} CI: 1.059–1.070) and number of hospitals (OR: 1.049, 95{\%} CI: 1.041–1.058) for risk of death were significantly higher than those with low medical utilization (OR: 1.040, 95{\%} CI: 1.037–1.043) and number of hospitals (OR: 1.029, 95{\%} CI: 1.027–1.032), respectively. The number of medical institution visited was significantly associated with risk of death. Therefore, diabetics should be warned about the potential of risk of death incurred from excessive access to medical utilizations.",
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Can diabetes patients seeking a second hospital get better care? Results from nested case–control study. / Kim, Jae Hyun; Park, Euncheol.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 1, e0210809, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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