Caste- and ethnicity-based inequalities in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge gap: A case of Nepal

Madhu Atteraya, Hee Jin Kimm, In Han Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caste- and ethnicity-based inequalities are major obstacles to achieving health equity. The authors investigated whether there is any association between caste- and ethnicity-based inequalities and HIV-related knowledge within caste and ethnic populations. They used the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey, a nationally represented cross-sectional study data set. The study sample consisted of 11,273 women between 15 and 49years of age. Univariate and logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between caste- and ethnicity-based inequalities and HIV-related knowledge. The study sample was divided into high Hindu caste (47.9 percent), "untouchable" caste (18.4 percent), and indigenous populations (33.7 percent). Within the study sample, the high-caste population was found to have the greatest knowledge of the means by which HIV is prevented and transmitted. After controlling for socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, untouchables were the least knowledgeable. The odds ratio for incomplete knowledge about transmission among indigenous populations was 1.27 times higher than that for high Hindu castes, but there was no significant difference in knowledge of preventive measures. The findings suggest the existence of a prevailing HIV knowledge gap. This in turn suggests that appropriate steps need to be implemented to convey complete knowledge to underprivileged populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Nepal
knowledge gap
caste
Social Class
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
ethnicity
HIV
Population Groups
Logistic Models
Demography
Population
health
cross-sectional study
equity
Cross-Sectional Studies
logistics
Odds Ratio
regression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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Caste- and ethnicity-based inequalities in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge gap : A case of Nepal. / Atteraya, Madhu; Kimm, Hee Jin; Song, In Han.

In: Health and Social Work, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 100-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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